Brits say Aprils Fools' day should be cancelled as 2020's one big joke

Britons call for April Fool’s Day to be CANCELLED this year as they brand it ‘insensitive’ and argue 2020 has been ‘one huge prank so far’ amid the coronavirus pandemic

  • Twitter users around the UK are encouraging people to ditch the jokes this year
  • It comes after 381 coronavirus-related deaths were announced in Britain today
  • One Brit said they’d seen their friends prepare for coronavirus-themed pranks
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

Britons have suggested April Fools’ Day pranks should be cancelled amid the coronavirus outbreak as they warned people to avoid being ‘insensitive’.

Twitter users around the UK took to social media to encourage Brits to ditch the jokes this year, saying ‘2020 has been one huge prank so far’.

It comes as a record-breaking 381 COVID-19 deaths have been announced in the UK today, taking the total to 1,789 fatalities.

Britons have suggested April Fools’ Day pranks should be cancelled (pictured) amid the coronavirus outbreak

Although the death toll surged, the number of patients being diagnosed has started to stabilise and today saw just 14 per cent more patients tested positive than yesterday – 3,009 up from 2,619.

But social media users still warned that the annual day for pranking should be cancelled amid the pandemic. 

One person pleaded: ‘Can we all just agree now that there’s no need for April Fools’ Day tomorrow? I’m all for using humour to get through a trying time, but I don’t think I could spot the difference at the moment!’

Another social media user said: ‘Right now, every day feels like it’s April Fools’ Day. #coronavirusUK’

A third insisted: ‘April Fools’ Day is cancelled this year because no made up prank could match the unbelievable s*** going on in the world right now.’

Other social media users (pictured) warned people to avoid being ‘insensitive’ this April Fools’ Day amid the COVID-19 pandemic

One shocked person even claimed they’d seen their Facebook friends prepare for coronavirus-themed pranks (pictured)

While a fourth joked: ‘If you’re considering coronavirus related April Fools’ Day pranks tomorrow, please slap yourself in the face as hard as possible and be smarter.’ 

One shocked person even claimed they’d seen their Facebook friends prepare for coronavirus-themed pranks. 

April Fools’ Day is usually the day when everyone pulls harmless pranks on each other and companies get in on the act too, publishing incredible stories to catch out the most gullible people.

The history behind it isn’t straight forward, as there is no one definitive theory explaining the origins of the day.

One suggestion attributes April Fools’ Day to the medieval poet Geoffrey Chaucer. 

Twitter users around the UK took to social media to encourage Brits to ditch the jokes this year, saying ‘2020 has been one huge prank so far’ (pictured)

In the narrative poem The Nun’s Priest’s Tale, a proud talking rooster called Chauntecleer is tricked by a ‘fox, full of sly iniquity’, 32 days since the beginning of March – on the April 1.

In the 1500s, Europe began to adopt the Gregorian calendar, which marked New Year’s Day as January 1, unlike the Julian calendar which marked the occasion on March 25.

However, because 25 March fell during the Holy Week, the New Year by the Julian Calendar was celebrated on April 1.

Therefore, the theory goes that once the transition to the Gregorian calendar occurred, it was a popular prank to convince people to still celebrate the New Year on April 1.

The arrival of spring also features prominently in April Fools’ origin theories. 

The celebration of spring, marked by something called ‘renewal festivals’, featured pranks, and temporary disruption of the social orders and mores.

The Roman festival of ‘Hilaria’, which was celebrated on March 25, was seen as a time to celebrate and play with masquerades and games.

Yet not everyone was keen on cancelling the annual day, saying jokes shouldn’t be banned amid the lock-down (pictured)

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