The truth about Lana del Rey and Ariana Grande’s relationship

We know that Lana Del Rey attracts other creative types. She’s had a long-term friendship with James Franco and has collaborated with several musicians over her prolific career. One collab that totally caught our attention was the union of Ariana Grande, Miley Cyrus and Lana Del Rey for the song “Don’t Call Me Angel” for Charlie’s Angels.

Since their artistic connection, it seemed like Del Rey could not stop singing Grande’s praises. In an interview with 104.3 MYfm in August 2019, Del Rey got asked about confidence and said, “Like Ariana. She’s very confident.”

In addition, Del Rey did an interview with The New York Times and praised Grande again while speaking about the Charlie’s Angels song: “First of all, I really, really like Ariana. I had been listening to ‘Dangerous Woman’ a lot. I got her number at some point and we would chat. And then ‘Thank U, Next’ came out and I freaking loved that record. Every song, I was like, how did she write that? So when she asked me to do the ‘Charlie’s Angels’ feature, I was like, ‘All right, if you really want me to!'”

She later added, “[T]hen Ariana’s choices of intonation, it might not be traditional, but it’s very good.”

While things looked solid between the two musicians, something has happened recently that might signify a feud between them. Keep reading to find out.

Lana Del Rey unfollows Ariana Grande

There was a trail of evidence that Lana Del Rey and Ariana Grande respected each other as musicians. Grande asked Del Rey to collaborate on the Charlie’s Angels song. Meanwhile, when Del Rey visited the BBC Radio 1 Live Lounge, she performed Grande’s song, “Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored.”

But trouble started brewing because of the recent posts Del Rey has shared on social media where she criticized other female musicians, including Grande, saying that they use sexuality in their music and wear “no clothes.”

Well, because of this, things might not be so great now between Del Rey and Grande. In a later post, Del Rey seemed to imply that Grande reached out to her, by saying: “Despite the feedback that I’ve heard from several people that I mentioned in a complementary way, whether it be Ariana or Doja Cat….” This totally sounds like Grande spoke with Del Rey.

As further evidence of a feud, Pop Crave pointed out on May 22, 2020 that Del Rey unfollowed Grande on Instagram shortly after that post. This doesn’t bode well. Hopefully they can work out the disagreement because we loved their collabs and the way they continually supported each other! 

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Watch as Arsenal legend Tony Adams recreates embarrassing dance from Granada managerial days with whole family – The Sun

TONY ADAMS got his family involved as he recreated THAT dance from his time in charge of Granada.

The Arsenal legend went viral in 2017 after he was caught chucking some serious shapes at the training ground.

Adams was filmed enthusiastically acting out training drills to his squad during his first session as manager.

He appeared to channel his inner David Brent as he wiggled from side to side before prancing forwards.

And the Gunners veteran has proved he's still got the moves as he recreated the dance with his family this week.

The 53-year-old led by example as the eight others copied his moves.

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MEAT and greet! UK set for a 77F scorcher today as barbecues resume

MEAT and greet! Britain is set for a 77F scorcher today when thousands will break out the barbecues as lockdown is eased allowing groups of six to meet

  • Pupils in Reception are set to head back to school this morning as are children in classes One and Six 
  • Vulnerable people who were advised to stay indoors during pandemic are allowed to go outside again 
  • Horseracing is set to resume at Newcastle Racecourse with no spectators as mass gatherings are banned 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Britain is set for a 77F scorcher today as thousands are breaking out barbecues due to lockdown being eased with the Government allowing groups of six to meet.

Restrictions across the country are lifting today as schools reopen for Reception as well as years One and Six and outdoor markets reopen along with car showrooms.

Horse racing will resume at Newcastle Racecourse but there will be no spectators present at the venue as mass gatherings remain banned.

And vulnerable people who have until now been advised to stay indoors due to the coronavirus pandemic will be permitted to go outside. 

The heat is set to rise to 84F  (29C) tomorrow, with temperatures remaining high until the middle of the week when they will level out. 

It comes after tombstoners were spotted in Plymouth and Dorset yesterday as thousands of Britons flouted lockdown by flocking to beaches ahead the government officially easing restrictions tomorrow.

Thrill-seekers ignored clear warnings and plunged 200ft off the cliffs at Dorset’s famous Durdle Door beach today less than 24 hours after four divers were injured at the same point.

Thousands of lockdown-weary families hit Britain’s parks and beaches to lap up the 75F (24C) heat despite government pleas for restraint, with Professor Jonathan Van-Tam asking the public ‘not to tear the pants out of’ the new rules during yesterday’s national press briefing. 

Dominic Raab today warned that a second UK lockdown could be imposed if there is an ‘uptick’ in cases after Britons are allowed to meet up to six people from different households, have barbecues and go to fitness classes once more. 

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2 million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines, from tomorrow.  

Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will come as a release to the largely-elderly shielding population.

People sunbathe on the beach looking east towards the i360 in Hove, on the south coast of England on May 31, 2020 on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules 

People gather together at Richmond Falls beauty spot on the River Swale, North Yorkshire on Sunday as they enjoy the sunny weather

Durdle Door in Dorset is filled with visitors this afternoon, despite four people being injured and the air ambulance being called on yesterday

A man is pictured jumping from Durdle Door today despite warnings after people were injured yesterday and the council closing the beach 


People continue to dive from Durdle Door on Sunday, despite warnings from the council telling visitors not to do so 

Tombstoners have also been spotted leaping into the water along Plymouth’s seafront today, despite four people injured in Dorset on Saturday

Pictured: People take to Durdle Door and dive off today despite the council warning that it is shut for safety reasons 

People are pictured descending on the beach at Durdle Door, Dorset, despite the council warning that it is closed today 


The coastguard is out patrolling at Durdle Door today. The Dorset beach is packed with visitors, despite the air ambulance landing at the beach yesterday

People were spotted jumping into the water at Three Shires Head on the River Dane in Cheshire on Sunday afternoon

There is no room for social distancing as umbrellas line Bournemouth beach on Sunday afternoon 

Bourton-on-the-Water in the Cotswolds is packed with visitors this afternoon as families visit the banks of its river 

Tombstoners were seen leaping from rocks and the bridge that crosses the River Dane on Sunday afternoon 

Brighton’s beaches were a popular choice for sunseekers looking to soak up the rays this weekend. Most beach-goers appear to be a safe two-metres apart from others 

A large number of police officers were seen patrolling Richmond Falls in North Yorkshire to ensure visitors maintained social distancing rules

People were seen gathering at Richmond Falls in North Yorkshire as they soaked up the sun on this scorching weekend

Two people rescued after aircraft crashes into water in Southampton 

A pilot and a passenger had to be rescued by the coastguard after their light aircraft crashed into the sea in Southampton.

The coastguard said the pair – who were both onboard the aircraft – were found by a nearby vessel at Calshot Spit. 

A large parachute could be seen attached to the back of the wreckage, suggesting it was deployed when the aircraft got into trouble.

An emergency responder can be heard telling onlookers to ‘clear the beach’.

The plane could be seen on the shore in Southampton. It lay belly-up and appeared to be washed up

In a tweet on Sunday, the Coastguard wrote: ‘HM Coastguard is dealing with an ongoing incident at Calshot Spit, where we are aware that an aircraft went down into the water.

‘Two people were onboard the aircraft and both people have been rescued.

‘They were located by a nearby vessel.’

No details on the condition of the rescued people were given.

Speaking at today’s Downing Street press briefing, Robert Jenrick said the Government will review the risks to the clinically extremely vulnerable as part of each review of social distancing measures for the wider population.

The Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government said the next review of shielding measures will take place in the week beginning on June 15.

Of the new guidance which allows people to spend time outdoors, he said: ‘This will enable those shielding to see loved ones like children and grandchildren, something many I know are aching to do.

‘Having spent many weeks indoors some will understandably be very cautious and concerned about going outdoors. You should only do what you are comfortable with.’

He added: ‘If the conditions become less favourable our advice to those being asked to shield will unfortunately need to be tightened. 

‘The Government will continue to ensure that support is available to those who need it for as long as possible and for as long as people are advised to follow the shielding guidance.’

He said, while the updated guidance from Monday for the shielded is for England only, the Government is working closely with the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ‘who will issue their own guidance in due course’.

It comes as the RNLI is facing demands to bring its lifeguards back after four tombstoners were injured in Dorset. 

Just sixteen beach patrols out of a possible 248 have been reinstated prompting furious backlash by sunseekers eagerly flocking to picturesque coastal spots.

Some lifeguards have started patrolling for free but without the RNLI’s backing they don’t have access to official lifesaving equipment, The Times reports.  

Hundreds have joined the #ReturnToShore campaign, with one saying ‘The RNLI lifeguard service is the only emergency service which did not continue during the pandemic. Why?’

  • Boris Johnson has issued a stern rebuke to his aide Dominic Cummings, warning that he ‘will not tolerate’ another media firestorm. The Prime Minister has ordered his top adviser to stay firmly out of the public eye following the crisis caused by his lockdown trip from London to Durham. 
  • Restless Britons on Satruday brushed aside warnings from police and scientists and were tempted outdoors by scorching temperatures, which climbed to highs of 82F 
  • Britain recorded 215 more Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, taking the official number of coronavirus victims to 38,376 – but it is the lowest Saturday total since lockdown began; 
  • Three SAGE scientists warned over the weekend that the lockdown is being lifted too quickly 
  • Thousands of sunbathers were forced to cram together at Durdle Door today as air ambulance helicopters were called to reports of three people seriously injured after jumping off cliffs into the sea 
  • A long, hot summer could help curb the spread of Covid-19, according to a top epidemiologist.. 

Speaking at today’s Downing Street press briefing, Robert Jenrick (pictured) said the Government will review the risks to the clinically extremely vulnerable as part of each review of social distancing measures for the wider population

Brits have been warned to take the easing of lockdown measures slowly, but Bournemouth beach shows families and other visitors squeezing together

Three Shires Head on the River Dane is attracting visitors during the warm weather on Sunday 

Britons enjoying the good weather at Ruislip Lido in London, as the public are being reminded to practice social distancing following the relaxation of lockdown restrictions

Crowds have flocked to Bournemouth beach on England’s south coast ahead of lockdown measures being eased on Monday

Sunbathers are out in force on Brighton Beach today on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules

Gulls flock above sunbathers on the beach in Brighton as Britain enjoys roasting 75F (24C) summer heat

Paddleboarders exercise social-distancing while afloat in the calm sea off Brighton – as thousands cram Britain’s beauty spots to soak up the day’s 75F (24C) heat

Ruislip Lido in London is packed today with social distancing appearing almost forgotten ahead of the more lockdown restrictions being eased by the government tomorrow 

People fill the beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, today despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public 

Brighton sunbathers soak up the 75F (24c) rays today on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules.

Topless cyclists ride along the Mall in London today as the parks across the city are packed with lockdown-wearing Britons soakin gup the 75F (24C) sun

Large groups, mainly of young people, continue to breach the existing rules and even the eased rules coming in to force tomorrow, in Clapham Common, South London

People enjoy the sun on Clapham Common after the Government eased restrictions and allowed people to meet from Monday

Many seem to be jumping the gun on, and exceeding, the new rules for meeting groups that come into force tomorrow as they enjoy the sun in Brockwell Park, South London

A group enjoy a drink in close proximity and take a selfie while not social distancing in Clapham common, south London

A tombstoner can be seen plummeting towards the sea after vaulting from the top of the ancient limestone arch known as Durdle Door in Dorset

A member of the coastguard looks over a packed beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public 

Police patrol the cliff top near Durdle Door, Lulworth, after Dorset Council announced that the beach was closed to the public after three people were seriously injured jumping off cliffs into the sea

Members of HM Coastguard Search and Rescue at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public after three people were seriously injured jumping off cliffs into the sea 

One RNLI lifeguard, who has started patrolling on a voluntary basis, said: ‘It feels as though the RNLI bosses don’t have our back. We’re volunteering with minimal equipment and at far greater risk.’  

From Monday, groups of up to six people will be able to meet outside in England as long as they observe social distancing as part of efforts to fight coronavirus.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said today: ‘This is a sensitive moment. We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition.’

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky News’ Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’ 

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset and walk the path to the beach at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine  

Inconsiderate visitors left this rubbish at the beach next to Durdle Door and the council warned people to stay away today following dangerous jumping yesterday  

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine despite officials warning them to stay away 

Visitors begin to arrive at the beach at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine with sunbathers heading to the beauty spot despite warnings not to do so 

Congestion levels in Southampton over the weekend show a 27 per cent rise in traffic from last week, suggesting more cars are heading to towards sea side towns

Congestion data for Bournemouth showed a 14 per cent rise in traffic over last week, while London only saw three per cent more traffic on last week

The number of cars on the road in Southampton over the weekend was up 27 per cent from last week, suggesting more traffic is heading to towards sea side towns.

While congestion data for Bournemouth showed a 14 per cent rise in traffic over last week, while London and Birmingham only saw a three per cent rise in traffic this weekend compared to last week.  

Liverpool saw 12 per cent more cars on the road this weekend verses last weekend while traffic in Manchester was up four per cent on last weekend. 

Yesterday a picturesque beach was trashed by revellers who left beer bottles, rubbish and laughing has cannisters strewn across the sand.

Formby beach in Merseyside was covered with litter on Saturday, despite pleas from police to continue social distancing.

In a statement the force said: ‘We are also asking people to remain respectful and protect our public spaces.

‘In recent days we have received reports of excessive littering and fires and BBQs being lit as well as people parking illegally and inconsiderately by blocking driveways and residential roads.’  

Despite the crowds being forced to group together following Saturday’s incident, people continue to flock to Durdle Door today

People make their way down the steps to the beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, today despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed 

Crowds have returned to Durdle Door today after the air ambulance was called to the Dorset beach on Saturday afternoon

Pictured: Grassholme Reservoir in County Durham today as temperatures across the country soar while lockdown restrictions are still in place  

People have taken to Brighton beach today with lockdown rules still in place as groups practised social distancing at the seaside 

Sunseekers are pictured on Brighton beach today as the UK prepares to further ease lockdown rules tomorrow and temperatures soar 

People sunbathe on the beach in front of the derelict West Pier in Brighton, on the south coast of England on May 31, 2020 on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules 

People enjoy the sunshine on a beach at Ruislip Lido at a reservoir in Ruislip, Britain, 31 May 2020 amid soaring temperatures 

People apply suncream in the sunshine on a beach at Ruislip Lido at a reservoir in Ruislip, Britain, 31 May 2020 with the south-east experiencing a surge in temperatures 

Dominic Raab admits lockdown will need to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’ in coronavirus cases

Dominic Raab today defended easing coronavirus lockdown in England despite a chorus of warnings about a second spike – but admitted that curbs will have to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’.

The Foreign Secretary acknowledged the loosening that takes effect tomorrow is a ‘sensitive moment’, but insisted the government was making sensible changes to get the country back up and running.

‘We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition,’ he said. 

Mr Raab played down fears that the curbs are being downgraded even though the government’s own coronavirus alert system level remains at four – which suggests they should stay in place.

And he stressed that ministers would not hesitate to reimpose restrictions in ‘localities’ or ‘settings’ if the number of cases begins to flare up again. 

But the Westminster government is facing a wave of opposition to the relaxation from scientists who say an increase in cases is ‘inevitable’, while Nicola Sturgeon has stressed she is being more ‘cautious’ and the virus can still ‘run out of control’.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (pictured today) said the government would not hesitate to act as he defended the decision to loosen draconian restrictions

A series of experts have raised concern about the moved to ease the lockdown in England, which takes effect from tomorrow, with the UK still getting 8,000 new infections a day.

Up to six people from six different households will be permitted to meet up in public places or gardens, meaning exercise classes and barbecues are back on the agenda. 

Primary schools and nurseries have also been told they can start to reopen, while all non-essential shops can return from June 15. 

In Scotland and Wales the loosening is far less dramatic, with only two households allowed to meet up at a time and people told not to travel more than five miles from home. Schools north of the border will not be back until after holidays there in August.    

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’  

Families across England will finally be able to see their elderly relatives again tomorrow, as millions of vulnerable people ‘shielding’ are allowed to spend time outdoors.

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines. Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will bring joy to thousands.

Boris Johnson today hailed the ‘resilience’ of those who have been shielding since March, with many having no face-to-face contact since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Prime Minister said: ‘I want to thank everyone who has followed the shielding guidance – it is because of your patience and sacrifice that thousands of lives have been saved. 

‘I do not underestimate just how difficult it has been for you, staying at home for the last ten weeks, and I want to pay tribute to your resilience.’

Meanwhile, Nicola Sturgeon today accused England of under-reporting care home deaths as she swiped at Mr Johnson for easing lockdown too early.

The Scottish First Minister said the apparent higher proportion of victims in care homes north of the border was due to the way they are recorded.

She insisted that people who died of stroke and ‘happened’ to have coronavirus were counted in the numbers in Scotland – whereas they were not in England, meaning that there was ‘under-reporting’.

Asked on Sky News whether she thought that the PM was loosening the lockdown in England too quickly, Ms Sturgeon insisted she did not want to ‘criticise other politicians’ and they were all ‘trying to do the right things’.  

But she pointedly said that in Scotland they were being ‘very cautious’. ‘This virus has not gone away,’ she said. ‘That is why in Scotland we are moving very slowly.’  

Prof Devi Sridhar, who has been advising the Scottish government, warned it looks ‘inevitable’ that cases will rise again in England. 

‘I’m very sorry to say that I think it is right now inevitable looking at the numbers,’ she told Sky.

‘The only thing that might in a sense save England is the good weather and warmth if this virus does indeed die outside quite quickly, but it’s incredibly worrying because the numbers are not low enough to have a testing and tracing system take over.’

‘If your objective is to contain the virus, to drive numbers down and to try to in a sense get rid of it so no-one is exposed to it, then it is not the right measure right now to open up,’ she said.

‘It’s a big risk and gamble for exiting lockdown with a larger number of deaths than we did when we actually entered lockdown months back.’

Prof Sridhar said there was now a clear divide between Government and some scientists, but added that ultimately decisions will be made by politicians.

She said: ‘I think what they should be saying is they consider the science, and hopefully they listen to it but the decision, and who actually has the accountability, are the politicians and leaders.’

Professor Peter Openshaw, who sits on the the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) to the Government, said people must proceed with ‘great caution’ as the lockdown is eased.

He told the BBC’s Andrew Marr programme: ‘At the moment, we still have quite a large number of cases out there in the community and I think unlocking too fast carries a great risk that all the good work that’s been put in by everyone, to try to reduce transmission may be lost. So we do need to proceed with great, great care at this point.’

Asked if the Government is going too fast, he said: ‘I think there is a pretty unanimous message now that we need to take this slowly and go step by step. We need to evaluate the effect of each step before we move to the next one. 

‘I don’t hear any great dissent amongst the amongst the advisers who are speaking in public at the moment.’

He said it will be around two or three weeks before the effects of the latest easing of restrictions is known.

He told the Marr show: ‘It’s going to be very patchy, it may be that actually easing lockdown is perfectly OK in areas like London which were hit early and hit hard, and where the epidemic seems to have been virtually passed in many parts of the community, with a few exception.

‘But up north it’s still a very large number of cases. I think we need to be more subtle about the geography and we need to look at the particular areas where it may be appropriate to ease lockdown.’

He added: ‘Maybe there needs to be a bit more subtlety to the way in which lockdown is eased.’ 

Prof Openshaw also said he believed advice on who needs to shield can be ‘fine tuned’ to prevent people being kept at home unnecessarily. 

Mr Johnson (pictured in Downing Street this morning) has announced that the lockdown restrictions will be eased slightly in England from tomorrow

‘I think we’re going to be able to fine-tune the advice now and actually reassure some people who we feared might be susceptible, that in fact they’re not as vulnerable as we thought. So that’s really good news,’ he said. 

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, the government’s chief science officer Sir Patrick Vallance explained Sage was only there to advise politicians, who have the final say on what to do with evidence presented to them. 

He wrote: ‘Science advice to Cobr and to ministers needs to be direct and given without fear or favour. But it is advice. Ministers must decide and have to take many other factors into consideration.’

The chair of Sage explained the advisory board was not infallible, writing: ‘There is a range of opinions in all of discussions and there is wide reading of the latest research, but what Sage endeavours to do is come down to a position or a range of positions, to provide options ministers could consider and explain the uncertainties and assumptions inherent in that science and evidence.’ 

Unions today insisted summer holidays should not be cancelled because teachers have been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown.

Despite the loss of face-to-face lessons, Mary Bousted, general secretary of the National Education Union, said her members deserved the time off.

She said any headteachers looking to recuperate lessons, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

In a broadside to government the trade union chief also slammed the government’s decision to re-open schools on June 1, saying if they had waited until June 15 the infection rate could have been halved. 

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from south London, Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise.

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again.

The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders. 

They may be off because they suffer from health conditions including asthma and diabetes, live with a vulnerable family member or because they are at heightened risk due to their age.

They also found eleven out of the country’s 20 worst performing councils on tests have told head teachers to keep the gates bolted.

The government plans to get Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils back to school on Monday, with an ambition to then get Year 10 and 12 back in lessons on June 15.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all pushed back their school start dates.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson sought to calm concerned parents today, writing in the Sun on Sunday that pupils will not be allowed to gather in groups larger than 15.

He also assured parents it would be safe, saying ‘strict safety measures’ have been put in place to protect children.

Referring to a Government adviser, Mr Raab said: ‘As Jonathan Van-Tam … has said, with a precarious moment we can ease up, we can protect life, but also livelihoods, get life back to something resembling normal, but we must monitor it very carefully,

‘If there is any up-tick in the number of cases, if we stop making the progress I described, we will have to take further measures again and target the virus wherever it may appear.’

Beach-goers were crammed together to make room for air ambulances to land at Durdle Door in Dorset yesterday after four people injured themselves jumping off cliffs into the sea. 

The four unidentified jumpers vaulted from the top of the ancient limestone arch, which reaches 200ft at its highest point, and are in critical condition, according to Dorset Police.  


Pictured: Today’s weather forecast from the Met Office as temperatures are set to climb even higher this afternoon 

Images from the scene show a mass of sun-seekers crammed into one area, near the only available exit, as they try to vacate the area as the air ambulance lands.  

‘Don’t tear the pants out of lockdown’  

England’s deputy chief medical officer yesterday pleaded with Britons ‘not to tear the pants out of’ the loosened lockdown when more freedoms are granted on Monday.  

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam warned that abusing new liberties would fuel the spread of infection and said that the lifting of curbs should be treated as if gently lifting the lid on a coiled spring – ‘painstakingly’ slow.   

He told yesterday’s Downing Street press conference: ‘This is a very dangerous moment – we have to get this right. People have to be sensible and proportionate with their freedoms.’ 

Despite initially claiming that only three people were hurt jumping off the famous archway, it emerged last night that the figure is one higher.  

Mark Dowie, the RNLI’s chief executive, wrote an open letter asking the government to restrict beach access before ‘more lives are lost’.

But former Conservative MP Charlotte Leslie says that the RNLI could fun a full £20million lifeguard service from the £124m in crisis funds that it reported in 2018. 

The organisation says that using such funds is not a long-term solution and the group expects a £45million shortfall this year.  

Police, the ambulance service, the coastguard and the RNLI attended the Dorset beauty spot on Saturday afternoon.

Videos posted on social media show people climbing and leaping from the arch at the site, which is 200ft high.

Air ambulances landed at the scene and crowds of people were evacuated from the beach and surrounding cliff area. Dorset Police confirmed that three people had sustained serious injuries and were receiving medical treatment.

That evening, Dorset Council said Durdle Door and Lulworth Cove would be closed ‘until further notice’. On Sunday morning, the council tweeted that the roads to the popular sites remained closed.

‘You will not be able to visit the beaches there and will be asked to turn around if you try and access the villages,’ the council said. 

People social distance whilst waiting for their morning coffee at the Plymouth Hoe in Devon today as temperatures soar 

People are pictured off the coast at Plymouth Hoe in Devon as sunseekers take to the sea and beach in rising temperatures 

It said the measure would be reviewed on Monday but urged people to avoid the area ‘for now’. Dorset Police tweeted: ‘Durdle Door and Lulworth Cove remain closed today along with approach roads to the area. Please do not travel as you will be turned away.’

On Saturday, a post on Poole Police’s Facebook page said the ‘critical incident’ had involved people jumping from the arch of Durdle Door into the sea.

Man in his 30s dies and two people are rescued after fishing boat sinks a mile off the Lancashire coast 

A man in his 30s has died and two others were rescued from the water after a boat sunk off the coast of Lancashire.

A vessel – thought to be a decommissioned fishing boat – got into trouble about a mile from the coast of Fleetwood.

A man went down with the boat and his body was later found by the RNLI.

The coastguard dispatched two lifeboats, the Shannon class 13-07 and the in-shore D class.

Two men – aged 70 and 71 – were picked up by support vessel Eden Rose from the local wind farm.

A man in his 30s has died and two others were rescued from the water after a boat sunk off the coast of Fleetwood, Lancashire (stock image pictured)

The men were taken back to shore by the Shannon class vessel before being rushed to hospital as a precaution after suffering from shock and the effects of the cold water.

The Shannon class vessel then returned to look for the missing man along with the Coastguard helicopter. 

The coastguard dispatched two lifeboats, the Shannon class 13-07 and the in-shore D class (stock image pictured)

 

‘The arch of Durdle Door is approximately 200 feet in height. Hitting water from that height, roughly 77mph, can be critical,’ it said.

‘This is further compounded by tides, currents and altering depth of the sea bed. It is NOT an appropriate location for this type of activity.’

Meanwhile, people were slammed for running around naked and causing harassment on a popular quayside, have caused a pub to shutdown.

The rising levels of anti social behaviour on The Quay in Exeter, Devon, has led to the Prospect Inn closing down its takeaway service.

The pub said: ‘WE ARE DONE. The anti social behaviour on the Quay worsens day by day, but Friday night was the final straw: abuse, harassment, urination and public nudity.’

Tories today slammed ‘hard-left’ unions opposing the reopening of schools amid claims a fifth of staff will stay off tomorrow.

The National Education Union (NEU) was accused of ‘chasing headlines’ by resisting the ‘phased and cautious’ plans to get pupils back in the classroom.   

The row came as general secretary Mary Bousted dismissed the idea of making up for lost time during the summer holidays, saying her members had been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown and deserved a break.

She said any headteachers looking to lay on catch-up classes, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again. The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders.

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from her home in south London, Ms Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise. 

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

 

Dominic Raab today defended easing coronavirus lockdown in England despite a chorus of warnings about a second spike – but admitted that curbs will have to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’.

The Foreign Secretary acknowledged the loosening that takes effect tomorrow is a ‘sensitive moment’, but insisted the government was making sensible changes to get the country back up and running.

Spain and Greece warn Britons will NOT be welcome when airlines return to the skies 

Airlines are plotting a major return to the skies come July, amid growing speculation that the government will ease its quarantine measures for international arrivals – but two summer hotspots may not allow Brits to visit.

British Airways, EasyJet and RyanAir have announced thousands of redundancies after the coronavirus lockdown grounded most of their flights in March.

But as domestic lockdown measures ease, companies are now scheduling more than 160,000 passenger flights from July, with room for 29.5million passengers, according to The Sunday Telegraph. 

Heathrow Airport has been empty in May compared to previous years, but airline companies are now planning a return to service in July, should quarantine measures be eased

Home Secretary Priti Patel’s quarantine plan, which from June 8 will require anyone entering the UK to self-isolate for two weeks, appeared to torpedo Britons’ hopes of a European summer holiday.

But there are rumblings the government could change its plan when the quarantine is reviewed on June 29.  

A senior industry source told The Telegraph: ‘The sense is that they might quietly do a U-turn after the first review period. Grant Shapps [Transport Secretary] is against quarantine, the Treasury are against it, Beis is against it and DCMS hate it.’

‘We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition,’ he said. 

Mr Raab played down fears that the curbs are being downgraded even though the government’s own coronavirus alert system level remains at four – which suggests they should stay in place.

And he stressed that ministers would not hesitate to reimpose restrictions in ‘localities’ or ‘settings’ if the number of cases begins to flare up again. 

But the Westminster government is facing a wave of opposition to the relaxation from scientists who say an increase in cases is ‘inevitable’, while Nicola Sturgeon has stressed she is being more ‘cautious’ and the virus can still ‘run out of control’. 

A series of experts have raised concern about the moved to ease the lockdown in England, which takes effect from tomorrow, with the UK still getting 8,000 new infections a day.

Up to six people from six different households will be permitted to meet up in public places or gardens, meaning exercise classes and barbecues are back on the agenda. 

Primary schools and nurseries have also been told they can start to reopen, while all non-essential shops can return from June 15. 

In Scotland and Wales the loosening is far less dramatic, with only two households allowed to meet up at a time and people told not to travel more than five miles from home. Schools north of the border will not be back until after holidays there in August.    

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’  

Families across England will finally be able to see their elderly relatives again tomorrow, as millions of vulnerable people ‘shielding’ are allowed to spend time outdoors.

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines. Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will bring joy to thousands.

Boris Johnson today hailed the ‘resilience’ of those who have been shielding since March, with many having no face-to-face contact since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

Pictured: The air ambulance helicopter touches down  at Durdle Door on Saturday afternoon before the council today closed the beauty spot due to injuries 

Rowers are pictured on the River Thames near Maidenhead in Berkshire as temperatures soar in the south-east of England 

The Prime Minister said: ‘I want to thank everyone who has followed the shielding guidance – it is because of your patience and sacrifice that thousands of lives have been saved. 

‘I do not underestimate just how difficult it has been for you, staying at home for the last ten weeks, and I want to pay tribute to your resilience.’

Boris Johnson’s SISTER Rachel is accused of flouting lockdown 

Rachel Johnson has been accused of bending lockdown rules by staying at her second home in Notting Hill after finishing her presenting shift at LBC.

Boris Johnson’s younger sister has previously said she is isolating at her home in Exmoor, Somerset, making only essential journeys to Leicester Square in London where she presents an evening show on the talk radio station.

According to The Mirror, instead of travelling four hours back to Somerset on Friday, Ms Johnson instead opted to stay at her second home in Notting Hill, where her two sons live.

Rachel Johnson was seen returning to her home in Notting Hill on Saturday, having stayed the night after a presenting shift on LBC on Friday

It is claimed she travelled back to the Exmoor farm, she shares with her husband and daughter, on Saturday morning by train. 

A Whitehall source told The Mirror: ‘It doesn’t look good for anyone,’ adding: ‘First his friend Dom and now his sister have been caught bending the rules, if not breaking them.’ 

The radio host’s spokesman told The Mirror Ms Johnson ‘sometimes stays over,’ after finishing her show at 7pm.

They added Ms Johnson has keyworker status as she is a broadcaster, saying she stays alert at all times while travelling between her job and her home. 

MailOnline has approached Ms Johnson’s for a full comment. 

 

Meanwhile, Nicola Sturgeon today accused England of under-reporting care home deaths as she swiped at Mr Johnson for easing lockdown too early.

The Scottish First Minister said the apparent higher proportion of victims in care homes north of the border was due to the way they are recorded.

She insisted that people who died of stroke and ‘happened’ to have coronavirus were counted in the numbers in Scotland – whereas they were not in England, meaning that there was ‘under-reporting’.

Asked on Sky News whether she thought that the PM was loosening the lockdown in England too quickly, Ms Sturgeon insisted she did not want to ‘criticise other politicians’ and they were all ‘trying to do the right things’.  

But she pointedly said that in Scotland they were being ‘very cautious’. ‘This virus has not gone away,’ she said. ‘That is why in Scotland we are moving very slowly.’ 

Prof Devi Sridhar, who has been advising the Scottish government, warned it looks ‘inevitable’ that cases will rise again in England. 

‘I’m very sorry to say that I think it is right now inevitable looking at the numbers,’ she told Sky.

‘The only thing that might in a sense save England is the good weather and warmth if this virus does indeed die outside quite quickly, but it’s incredibly worrying because the numbers are not low enough to have a testing and tracing system take over.’

‘If your objective is to contain the virus, to drive numbers down and to try to in a sense get rid of it so no-one is exposed to it, then it is not the right measure right now to open up,’ she said.

‘It’s a big risk and gamble for exiting lockdown with a larger number of deaths than we did when we actually entered lockdown months back.’

Prof Sridhar said there was now a clear divide between Government and some scientists, but added that ultimately decisions will be made by politicians.

She said: ‘I think what they should be saying is they consider the science, and hopefully they listen to it but the decision, and who actually has the accountability, are the politicians and leaders.’

Professor Peter Openshaw, who sits on the the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) to the Government, said people must proceed with ‘great caution’ as the lockdown is eased.

He told the BBC’s Andrew Marr programme: ‘At the moment, we still have quite a large number of cases out there in the community and I think unlocking too fast carries a great risk that all the good work that’s been put in by everyone, to try to reduce transmission may be lost. So we do need to proceed with great, great care at this point.’

Asked if the Government is going too fast, he said: ‘I think there is a pretty unanimous message now that we need to take this slowly and go step by step. We need to evaluate the effect of each step before we move to the next one. 

UK announces official daily Covid-19 death toll of 113 – the lowest since lockdown – taking the official count to 38,489 

The UK has announced 113 more Covid-19 deaths today, the lowest since lockdown began, taking the official count to 38,489. 

Today the Department of Health reported the lowest figure in almost ten weeks – 74 people died on March 23, after which the crisis spiralled out of control.

However, the weekends always see a significant drop in deaths due to a lag in reporting.

Last Sunday health officials declared 118 deaths, which was a 30 per cent drop from the week before.

Today has not seen such a dramatic reduction from the week before. But deaths are still declining from the peak in mid-April when the worst day saw 1,172 people die.

Back-dated data from death certificates shows more than 46,000 people had been killed by the virus by May 15, 36 per cent more than the official toll given by the Department of Health (33,998) at that time. 

If the same mathematical sum was applied to today’s DH count of 38,489, it would suggest the true death toll currently is around the 51,000 mark. 

There have been 274,762 positive test results since the crisis began. But this is a tiny fraction of the millions who would have been infected and never got a test.

DH said that testing capacity reached the Prime Minister’s 200,000 target yesterday, after promises it would be met before June 1, despite only 115,700 tests being conducted.

It said it had reached its 200,000 goal because it had the ‘capacity’ to take 40,000 antibody tests of health workers every day, which detect if a person has already had the infection and recovered. 

The government was accused of ‘bending the rules’ to reach its initial coronavirus testing target of 100,000 per day by the end of April by including home testing kits that had been sent out, but not processed. 

Despite the Prime Minister saying the government’s five tests have been met and it is safe to start relaxing restrictions from tomorrow, the alert level remains at four.

There are still 54,000 new infections happening each week – down from 61,000 per week at the start of May – and 133,000 people are thought to currently have the virus, down from 137,000. This means one in 1,000 people are still catching it.

‘I don’t hear any great dissent amongst the amongst the advisers who are speaking in public at the moment.’

He said it will be around two or three weeks before the effects of the latest easing of restrictions is known.

He told the Marr show: ‘It’s going to be very patchy, it may be that actually easing lockdown is perfectly OK in areas like London which were hit early and hit hard, and where the epidemic seems to have been virtually passed in many parts of the community, with a few exception.

‘But up north it’s still a very large number of cases. I think we need to be more subtle about the geography and we need to look at the particular areas where it may be appropriate to ease lockdown.’

He added: ‘Maybe there needs to be a bit more subtlety to the way in which lockdown is eased.’ 

Prof Openshaw also said he believed advice on who needs to shield can be ‘fine tuned’ to prevent people being kept at home unnecessarily. 

‘I think we’re going to be able to fine-tune the advice now and actually reassure some people who we feared might be susceptible, that in fact they’re not as vulnerable as we thought. So that’s really good news,’ he said. 

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, the government’s chief science officer Sir Patrick Vallance explained Sage was only there to advise politicians, who have the final say on what to do with evidence presented to them. 

He wrote: ‘Science advice to Cobr and to ministers needs to be direct and given without fear or favour. But it is advice. Ministers must decide and have to take many other factors into consideration.’

The chair of Sage explained the advisory board was not infallible, writing: ‘There is a range of opinions in all of discussions and there is wide reading of the latest research, but what Sage endeavours to do is come down to a position or a range of positions, to provide options ministers could consider and explain the uncertainties and assumptions inherent in that science and evidence.’ 

Unions today insisted summer holidays should not be cancelled because teachers have been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown.

Despite the loss of face-to-face lessons, Mary Bousted, general secretary of the National Education Union, said her members deserved the time off.

She said any headteachers looking to recuperate lessons, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

In a broadside to government the trade union chief also slammed the government’s decision to re-open schools on June 1, saying if they had waited until June 15 the infection rate could have been halved. 

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from south London, Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise.

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again. The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders. 

They may be off because they suffer from health conditions including asthma and diabetes, live with a vulnerable family member or because they are at heightened risk due to their age.

They also found eleven out of the country’s 20 worst performing councils on tests have told head teachers to keep the gates bolted.

The government plans to get Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils back to school on Monday, with an ambition to then get Year 10 and 12 back in lessons on June 15.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all pushed back their school start dates.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson sought to calm concerned parents today, writing in the Sun on Sunday that pupils will not be allowed to gather in groups larger than 15. He also assured parents it would be safe, saying ‘strict safety measures’ have been put in place to protect children.

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ANDREW PIERCE: Boris Johnson a hero to David Cameron's rich pal

ANDREW PIERCE: Boris Johnson is every inch a hero to David Cameron’s rich pal

After refusing to sack Dominic Cummings for allegedly breaking lockdown rules, Boris Johnson appears to have lost the support of a number of disgruntled Tory MPs.

But at least he can find solace in having forged a new alliance with a powerful ally. For I can reveal that he has secured the surprising backing of billionaire property mogul Tony Gallagher.

Tory donor Gallagher’s patronage certainly comes with its perks. 

In 2016, when he was a keen supporter of David Cameron, he hosted the former Prime Minister’s 50th birthday party at his home, one of the grandest private properties in Britain: 17th-century Sarsden House, in Oxfordshire, which is set in 459 acres of land.

Boris Johnson has forged a new alliance with a powerful ally – he has secured the surprising backing of billionaire property mogul Tony Gallagher

While Boris is yet to receive such a generous offer, last month Gallagher did present him with an £800 silver ruler engraved with the name of every British Prime Minister, including Mr Johnson’s. 

Leader of the Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg, who argued successfully for the Virtual Parliament to end and MPs to return to Westminster this week, seems to have enjoyed his time at home. ‘I’m reading a book on the Black Death,’ he recently said. 

What better way to lift one’s spirits in these dark times?

News of such a lavish gift will no doubt leave Westminster watchers scratching their heads — not least because Gallagher was a staunch Remainer in the EU referendum and gave thousands to the cause.

But Gallagher tells me: ‘I think Boris is tremendous and is doing a good job in incredibly difficult circumstances.’

Asked which engraved name on the ruler was his favourite PM, Gallagher, whose similar gifts to David Cameron and Theresa May were put on display in the Cabinet Office, says: ‘Ah, good try, but you’re not getting me on that. 

They all have their strengths but I am a huge admirer of Boris.’

Is that a Covid clanger, Nick? 

When BBC presenter Nick Robinson interviewed Tory MP John Penrose last week about Covid-19 in his local hospital in Weston-super-Mare, Robinson asked if the new Government test-and-trace scheme ‘run by a woman called Dido Harding’ would help.

Penrose replied: ‘As a matter of disclosure, Dido Harding is my wife.’

As a matter of disclosure, do you think Robinson blushed. 

Dominic Cummings has come under fire for driving 260 miles to Durham from London. The No.10 special adviser is pictured leaving his north London home on May 29

In the delay before Dominic Cummings’s press conference last week, Tim Burgess, of rock band The Charlatans, tweeted: ‘If you were this late for a JobCentre interview, you’d lose your benefits.’

Five minutes later, Shadow Foreign Secretary Lisa Nandy told her followers on social media: ‘If Dominic Cummings turned up this late to the JobCentre he’d be sanctioned.’ Her post garnered 65,000 ‘likes’.

Shall we be charitable and call that a cover version? 

No porkies: Parliament’s £3m meat bill

The pandemic may have left Parliament deserted but MPs will be relieved to learn that its opulent charms will still be there when calm is restored.

Indeed, it has just issued a tender for its supply of meat, poultry and game over the next four years, to the tune of £3 million — which is lip-smackingly good news for its canteen aficionados. But aren’t there enough porkies doing the rounds in Westminster? 

Joke of the week: This gag is doing the rounds among politicos: ‘Dominic Cummings is a golfing term. It’s a long drive that goes out of bounds but carries no penalty.’

Tory MP Douglas Ross, who resigned as a junior Scottish Office minister following Dominic Cummings’s trip to Barnard Castle, is a qualified professional football referee. 

Cue the inevitable riposte from Tory MPs: ‘He’s given himself a red card.’

New Tory MP Lee Anderson may only have been in the job for a matter of months, but that hasn’t stopped him sticking the boot in.

‘Seeing as Boris has said up to six people can meet outdoors, there is now a good chance the Lib Dem Conference can go ahead,’ the MP for Ashfield remarked. Ouch! 

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Have a taste of normal with a picnic on a budget now lockdown has eased – The Sun

THE great British picnic is enjoying a revival – one of the first treats we can look forward to as lockdown eases.

From Monday, outdoor fun need not be with just your own household, or one friend. You will be able to meet in groups of up to six, from different homes, if you stay two metres apart.

So here are tips for how to picnic on a budget . . .

  1. Towel tip: Don’t splash out £17.60 on the John Lewis Meadow Spot picnic rug, dig out a few old beach towels — easy to carry and wash. Or if you do not have any to hand, get the tartan rug from B&M for £5.
  2. Lotta bottle: Keep hold of old plastic drink bottles, rinse and refill with squash. This should keep the kids happy, and your wallet. It also means you do not need to carry lots of cups. Pop the filled bottles into the freezer the night before and they will stay cool for longer and also help to chill the food in your bag.
  3. Nice one, old fruit: Chop up some lemon and lime, freeze overnight, then put a few slices into drinks and sandwich bags to keep everything cool. Create ice-packs by filling sandwich bags with water, zipping up and freezing overnight.
    Snack attack: It is not a picnic without sausage rolls. At tesco.com packs of 20 mini sausage rolls and 30 pork cocktail sausages are normally £2 each. But now, for £3, you can snap up one of each or two of either.
    Consider buying bulk bags of frozen snacks and cooking, cooling and storing in plastic tubs for the picnic — cheaper than buying ready-made.
    Dips can be knocked up yourself, too. A pot of cottage cheese and dried herbs equals a tasty cream-cheese treat that is a fraction of the cost of pre-made. If pushed for time, Aldi does a lovely hummus for 69p a pot.
  4. Lunchtime hacks: To avoid food going to waste, make up boxes for each family member, according to what they like. Kids will love having their own stash. Cherry tomatoes, cucumber, apples and multi-pack crisps are all good staples.
  5. Wet wipes: Make sure everything gets a wipe-down before, during and after your feast. You can get 80 of Superdrug’s own-brand anti-bacterial wipes for £3.09 — cheaper than 70 Dettol wipes for £3.50 at wilko.com.
  6. Cheers: Make some of the savings above and you will have cash left for Lidl’s summer wine selection, from £5.49 a bottle.

Deal of the day

SIT back in style with a modern hanging egg chair from Aldi.

You can pre-order yours on Monday for £149.99.

See aldi.co.uk to place your order.

Cheap treat

M&S has launched a low-fat ice cream.

The Madagascan vanilla ice cream is just 62 calories per portion and costs £3 a tub – making your treat a little sweeter.

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Giselle's little helper

A NEW fitness channel is coming to Virgin Media TV. Get Moving will launch at 6.30am on Monday.

It will air from Monday to Friday to give viewers specialist fitness sessions provided by celebrity personal trainers and Olympians including Daley Thompson.

The channel will be available to all Virgin Media TV customers at no extra cost.

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SpaceX live stream: Bizarre ‘anomaly’ spotted during Falcon 9 first-stage entry revealed

Tonight, Elon Musk’s SpaceX will launch two NASA astronauts into orbit on their way to the International Space Station from US soil for the first time in almost a decade. Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken – two of NASA’s most experienced astronauts – will liftoff from Florida’s Kennedy Space Centre inside the Crew Dragon spacecraft powered by the Falcon 9 rocket. It will be the first crewed mission of SpaceX and marks the return of human spaceflight from US soil since NASA retired its space shuttle fleet in 2011.

But, video footage has emerged this week showing what is being described as an “anomaly” appearing during one of Falcon 9’s last missions to launch a series of Starlink satellites in orbit.

During the live stream posted on SpaceX’s YouTube channel, the footage says: “For those of you just joining us, good morning and welcome, we just had a successful liftoff of the Falcon 9 about four minutes ago.

“There’s a lot going on right now, on the right-hand side of your screen our second stage, its Merlin vacuum engine is currently burning and will continue to do so for a few minutes.

“It’s carrying 60 Starlink satellites for eventual payload deploy, but we’re going to focus the next few minutes on the left-hand side of the screen with our first stage.

“Currently right now after stage separation, that first stage is boosting, still gliding up without any engine power, and for the next few seconds, it’s going to start to free-fall to the Earth surface for an attempted first-stage recovery on our drone ship in the Atlantic.”

The video then showed the rocket as it was about to split following the first-stage completion.

It continued: “As our first stage reorientates itself, we’re going to prepare for the first of two engine burns on that first stage to aid our recovery – the first of which is coming up in about 90 seconds – known as entry burn.

“We fire three of the nine Merlin engines in the opposite direction to where we are heading to slow down the vehicle about 25 percent before we hit the dense part of the atmosphere.

“Not performing this burn would put unnecessary strain on our first stage.

“We’re about 15 seconds away from that entry burn, we’re going to wait for that visual confirmation that the burn has started and call-out says that engine burn was successful.”

It was at this point that a small, metallic-looking anomaly made its way past the camera, but the commentator on the video did not seem to notice it.

Viewers quickly flooded into the comments to let him know, though.

One wrote: “Looks like a piece of space debris.”

Another questioned: “What is the thing that passed the first stage in the right-hand side of the left screen on re-entry?”

A third simply declared: “UFO spotted.”

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And a fourth even speculated: “Two UFOs flew away, there were two unidentified objects.”

But others suggested something had fallen off the rocket during the engine blasts.

The countdown to today’s launch is under way, although some bad weather could push the mission back to Saturday.

The Air Force’s 45th Space Wing, which oversees space launch operations from the East Coast, currently forecasts a 50 percent chance that clouds or stormy weather will violate established launch safety guidelines.

But NASA hopes to go ahead with the mission and restore some positivity back into the world.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said on Tuesday in a news briefing: “Our country has been through a lot.

“But this is a unique moment when all of America can take a moment and look at our country do something stunning again, and that is to launch American astronauts on an American rocket from American soil to the space station.”

After lifting off, Mr Behnken and Mr Hurley will spend around 19 hours orbiting the Earth before their capsule makes its rendezvous with the space station, where they will stay between six and 16 weeks.

The test flight is the last major milestone for SpaceX under NASA’s Commercial Crew Programme, which was designed to foster partnerships between the agency and private companies to develop new spacecraft for routine trips to the space station.

For the last nine years, NASA has been hitching rides to the ISS aboard Russian capsules and rockets.

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Will Britain see a weekend lockdown rebellion?

Will Britain see a weekend lockdown rebellion? Fears that scorching weather will tempt public into partying before new rules allowing six-strong groups come in on MONDAY

  •  Prime Minister has allowed groups of six people to meet up from Monday
  • Government urges people not to use hot weather as an excuse to break the rules
  • Supermarkets recorded record spends on sausages, beer, wine and ice cream

Fears were growing last night that scorching weekend weather will tempt large numbers to break lockdown early by holding barbecues and other family gatherings.

Boris Johnson has given the green light for outdoor gatherings of up to six people in England from Monday.

But Downing Street urged the public not to jump the gun today and tomorrow as temperatures soar above those in the Mediterranean.

Some clearly already had yesterday. A stretch of riverside in Ilkley, West Yorkshire, was packed with young revellers, who shunned social distancing rules to top up their tans.

And in Christchurch, Dorset, one family took folding chairs along as they gathered in a park.

Supermarkets reported last night that shoppers were already spending record sums on sausages, beer, wine and ice cream in anticipation of weekend barbecues and picnics.

Police chiefs and MPs have complained that the Government has created an impossible situation by announcing the changes too far in advance. There is also the possibility for confusion as while Wales also does not relax its lockdown rules until Monday, Scotland did so from yesterday.

From Monday, the number of people able to meet at once in England will be increased from two to six and they may use private gardens. But members of different households must still stay two metres apart. Tory former minister Tobias Ellwood said last night: ‘The nation has been incredibly disciplined to date.

‘Is it wise to tell the public that they can have barbecues with friends from Monday before a sunny weekend?’

Northumbria’s Labour Police and Crime Commissioner Kim McGuinness said: ‘The PM must have known he was going to create a situation that is difficult to police. The messaging looks like it was rushed forward to help ministers in a difficult position.’

Sun day: Two girls enjoy the warm weather on Portobello beach, Edinburgh, yesterday

Anthony Stansfeld, the Conservative Police and Crime Commissioner for Thames Valley, said: ‘People should obey the rules – things are only just beginning to open up, so please don’t pre-empt them. All the relaxation of lockdown is being carefully timed by the Government’s chief scientists for good reason. It’s far better if people wait and do things at the proper time, so please don’t jump the gun. A bit more freedom is coming on Monday, so I urge everyone to be patient.’

Merseyside police warned that people would be fined if they turned up to parks and beaches in large groups this weekend.

Superintendent Jonathan Davies said: ‘I know people will be tempted to get outside. This is a reminder that the rules on spending time with only one other person from another household remains in place this weekend.’

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman defended the decision to announce the change on Thursday, saying: ‘We’ve said that wherever possible we would give a period of notice in advance of changes being made, ideally 48 hours or more. We’re enormously grateful for the efforts of the British public in sticking by the rules and getting the infection rate down and that does mean that from June 1 we will be able to allow people to have some more social contact in a safe and socially-distanced way. I’m sure that members of the public will show common sense.’

Police will not be carrying out spot checks on private gardens, the spokesman said.

Pictured: Hordes of young people have fun by the riverside in Ilkley, West Yorkshire

Supermarkets reported the biggest sales of barbecue food on record. Charcoal sales are more than double those of a year ago and retailers such as John Lewis and B&Q have seen a surge in sales of barbecues at the end of the sunniest May since 1929.

The Co-op expects sales of its barbecue products to be up 80 per cent on last week and 320 per cent on a year ago. Marks & Spencer has seen sales of its own brand Prosecco double and its largest ever sales of rosé wine.

Britain is set to be warmer than much of southern Europe and even Bermuda as the heatwave continues through the weekend into next week.

Temperatures could reach 27C or even 28C (80 to 82F) in southern England today and tomorrow.

There is an outside chance the record for the warmest day of the year so far – 28.2C (82.8F) at Santon Downham, Suffolk, on May 20 – could be broken.

It could be even warmer by midweek, forecasters say.

The Met Office revealed yesterday that the UK has experienced its sunniest spring since records began in 1929.

An average of 573 hours of sunshine across the country were recorded up to Wednesday, with warm sunshine in most places since then and more forecast for the last two days of the month, today and tomorrow, as a record-breaking spring comes to an end. 

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SUV ploughs into a George Floyd protesters and then rams into a man

Shocking moment SUV ploughs into a George Floyd protesters and then rams into a man who tried to hold onto the car’s hood during a Black Lives Matter demonstration

  • Black Lives Matter protesters in Denver get out of way of Jeep Grand Cherokee
  • One man can be seen on top of the hood of the car before running away 
  • The car started to drive off before it appeared to suddenly swerve into the man

An SUV ploughed into a group of Black Lives Matter protesters before ramming into a man on the third night of unrest after the killing of unarmed black man George Floyd. 

White police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes until he passed out and later died earlier this week. 

His death sparked outrage and protests in various states, including Colorado.

Shocking footage shows Black Lives Matter protesters in Denver get out of the way of a black Jeep Grand Cherokee as it careens through the group.

A driver appeared to swerve to hit a protester in Denver on the third night of unrest after the killing of unarmed black man George Floyd

Shocking footage shows Black Lives Matter protesters get out of the way of a black Jeep Grand Cherokee as it careens through the group

One man can be seen on top of the hood of the car before jumping down and running away.

The car starts to drive off before it appears to suddenly swerve.

It charges into the man as a horrified onlooker yells: ‘Watch out!’ 

The protester is thrown to the floor but quickly jumps up and – joined by others – starts chasing the SUV as it drives away.

One man can be seen on top of the hood (pictured) of the car before jumping off and running away

The protester is thrown to the floor but quickly jumps up and – joined by others – starts chasing the SUV as it drives away

The clip was shared to Twitter by Joshua Potash with the caption: ‘Warning: this is horrifying.

‘Tonight at a Black Lives Matter protest in Denver a car pushed through the protesters blocking the street.

‘Then intentionally turned to try to run a man over.’

Panic also erupted in Denver when shots were fired during a march on the Colorado State Capitol. No injuries were reported.

Viewers quickly likened the video to the murder of Heather Heyer in 2017 who died after James Alex Fields Jr. mowed her down with his car at a protest in Charlottesville. 

It came the same night that rioters broke into a police station in Minneapolis – the city where Floyd was killed – and torched it. 

It came the same night that rioters broke into a police station in Minneapolis – the city where Floyd was killed – and torched it 

Minneapolis, Minnesota: The police building is engulfed in flames as rioters took over the building and set it alight

Minneapolis, Minnesota: A mob descended upon Minneapolis Third Precinct, smashing windows before setting the building on fire during the second night of violent protests

Shocking footage showed flames billowing out of the Minneapolis Third Police Precinct just hours after prosecutors warned there is ‘evidence that does not support criminal charges’ in the case of the four cops accused of killing Floyd, sparking fears that they will continue to walk free.  

In New York City, NYPD officers were seen brawling on the ground with protesters as at least 70 people were arrested in the Big Apple.  

Protesters in Ohio smashed the windows of the statehouse in downtown Columbus and raided the building and demonstrators damaged a police cruiser in downtown Los Angeles. 

Over in Kentucky, seven people were shot in downtown Louisville during a protest demanding justice for black woman Breonna Taylor who was shot dead by cops back in March, as the Floyd case reignited tensions between cops and the African-American community. 

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Employers will pay a quarter of furloughed staff's wages from August

Employers will have to pay a quarter of furloughed staff’s wages from August, Chancellor Rishi Sunak is expected to announce

  • Rishi Sunak will ask businesses to pay 25 per cent of furlough money for staff
  • Chancellor is expected to make radical announcement today or this weekend
  • It comes as 8.4 million workers are now furloughed to cost of £15bn to date
  • Britain faces the biggest economic nosedive of the industrial period – since 1709 

A quarter of the wages of furloughed staff will be paid by employers from August, Rishi Sunak is expected to announce imminently. 

The Chancellor will ask businesses to contribute 25 per cent of the wages paid through the government’s furlough scheme unveiled in March. 

He will also explain how people will be able to work part-time while still having their wages part-paid by his Job Retention Scheme.

Mr Sunak is expected to make the announcement either today or over the weekend as the government seeks to restart the engines of UK plc.

It comes as 8.4 million workers are now furloughed to a cost of £15billion to date, according to data provided by HM Revenue & Customs. 

A quarter of the wages of furloughed staff will be paid by employers from August (pictured, closed shops in a deserted Carnaby Street in central London)

Chancellor Rishi Sunak will ask businesses to contribute 25 per cent of the government’s furlough scheme unveiled at the start of lockdown 

From August, employers must contribute one quarter of the furlough scheme, in which 80 per cent of wages for workers are paid by the state. 

Mr Sunak’s radical scheme will be closed to new entrants from the end of June, according to Treasury plans seen by The Daily Telegraph. 

All employers will be required to make the payments if they continue to furlough their staff, regardless of whether their business has been allowed to open. 

Over two million self-employed workers are also receiving grants to cover income lost through the disruption caused by the pandemic.

More than one in three private sector workers are now being paid by the state.

The Chancellor recently warned that Britain is facing a ‘severe recession’ and warned that lockdown is having a ‘severe impact’ on the economy. 

Mr Sunak is expected to make the announcement either today or over the weekend as the government seeks to restart the engines of UK plc (pictured, shops in Slough)

The Office for National Statistics said borrowing was up £51.1billion on the same month in 2019

All employers will be required to make the payments if they continue to furlough their staff, regardless of whether their business has been allowed to open

His claims have been echoed by economic analysts who in early April estimated that lockdown has costed Britain around £2.4billion per day.

The Bank of England forecast this month a 30 per cent contraction of GDP in the next quarter before potentially rising by 15 per cent by late 2020.

Bank staff believe this would represent the biggest nosedive of the industrial period, equivalent to the agrarian Great Frost crisis 300 years ago. 

Mr Sunak has extended the Job Retention Scheme until the end of October, though he said it would be altered in August to encourage people to return to work. 

Over two million self-employed workers are also receiving grants to cover income lost through the disruption caused by the pandemic

The figures appear to be even worse than the doomladen estimates produced by the independent OBR watchdog last week

The Chancellor told MPs: ‘We are in deep consultation with both unions and business groups to make sure we get the design of the second part of this scheme right.

‘I think it is right both for the economy and, indeed, for the taxpayer to ask employers to make a contribution.

‘They will have the benefit of flexible furloughing to help offset that.’ 

This week, the government vowed not to increase income tax, VAT or national insurance despite coronavirus wreaking havoc on the public finances. 

Boris Johnson also promised that the triple lock on state pensions – which means they rise by the highest of inflation, earnings, or 2.5 per cent – would be maintained. 

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Who are Sue and Noel Radford and how many children do they have? – The Sun

NOEL and Sue Radford are at the helm of Britain's biggest family.

But who are the couple – who will star with their brood in a new TV show – and how many children do they have?

Who are Sue and Noel Radford?

The couple were both given up for adoption at birth.

Sue, now 45, fell pregnant with Chris at just 14 in 1989 and was determined to keep the baby.

She married Noel, now 49, four years later – and they were soon expecting their second child Sophie.

Just over a year later they learned they were expecting Chloe – and babies have followed in quick succession ever since.

The family do not claim benefits and keep finances afloat through a successful family-owned bakery.

They live in a ten-bed home, which they bought for £240,000 in 2004.

Each day the family consumes 18 pints of milk, three litres of juice and eat three boxes of cereal at breakfast.

Their supermarket trips cost £250 a week and they have outgrown their 15-seater minivan.

In a video on their YouTube channel, they revealed that they are filming a new TV show.

Sue said: “We’re filming for a series at the moment."

Noel added: “It’s a series this time, a three-part.

“We started filming but everything that has been filmed has been by us. They sent all the big cameras, the tripod, the Go-Pros, everything and all the interviews have been done via Zoom.

“I’ve been doing the filming, Luke’s done a bit of the filming so I think when it does go on the telly you will definitely notice it’s not been done professionally.”

It’s not the first time the family has been filmed for TV, and first appeared on Channel 4 in a documentary called '15 kids and counting' in 2012.

Noel added: “We’re not with Channel 4 anymore.”

"Watch this space," Sue added. "We’re not sure when it will be shown. It might be the end of the year, beginning of next year.”

When did Sue Radford last give birth?

Sue gave birth to their 22nd child – a little girl – on April 3, 2020.

Shortly afterwards, they named their daughter Heidie Rose.

She has spent more than 800 weeks of her life pregnant, has sworn this will be her last baby.

How many children do they have?

The Radfords have 22 children.

The couple's children are: including Chris, 30, Sophie, 25, Chloe, 23, Jack, 22, Daniel, 20, Luke, 18, Millie, 17, Katie, 16, James, 15, Ellie, 14, Aimee, 13, Josh, 12, Max, 11, Tillie, nine, Oscar, seven, Casper, six, Hallie, three, Phoebe, two, Archie 18 months, Bonnie, one, and Heidie, one month.

Sadly, the couple's 17th child Alfie was stillborn on July 6, 2014.

Their two eldest children, Chris and Sophie, no longer live at home.

They are also grandparents to Sophie’s three children.

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