Quarantine ‘scrapped and replaced with air bridges in weeks’ as PM to keep holiday hopes alive for lockdown-weary Brits – The Sun

QUARANTINE rules look set to be ditched as Boris Johnson wants to keep summer holiday hopes alive amid the easing of lockdown.

The PM has reportedly told ministers to work on solutions to keep international travel open for lockdown-weary Brits.

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It comes as Home Secretary Priti Patel is set to reveal today that countries with strict anti-coronavirus measures are likely to be handed "air bridges" in the future.

She will also reveal details of the upcoming quarantine plan – with some aspects expected to be watered down.

Air bridges are links between Britain and some countries with low infection rates – with hopes they could be in place by the end of June.

The 14-day isolation for everyone arriving in the UK is already locked in and will be introduced on Monday.

It could mean that Brits wanting to go away this summer would have to take an additional two weeks off work for their hols.

Tourist bosses and business chiefs have warned current plans could devastate their industries and lead to mass unemployment.

The PM is pushing for air bridges to allow Brits to go aboard and foreign tourists to come here, reports the Daily Mail.

A Downing Street source said: "We will be guided by the science, but the PM does not want to be standing in the way of people's holidays unnecessarily."

Ministers are reportedly also weighing up plans to test travelers for coronavirus upon their arrival in the UK.

Quarantine will be reviewed on June 29 to see if infection rates are low enough so measures can be relaxed to allow the "air bridges" to be set up.

However, Ms Patel has warned "we will all suffer if we get this wrong" as she said the UK "owes it to the victims of Covid-19" to impose a quarantine.

Writing in the Telegraph, the Home Secretary argues that tourism will be back quicker if tougher steps are taken against the virus.

She does raise the possibility of air bridges – but stopped short of putting on a hard date – in the article jointly penned with Transport Secretary Grant Shapps.

Ms Patel said: "Let’s not throw away our progress in tackling this deadly virus. We owe it to the thousands who have died."

She added: "We must keep the country safe from potentially infected passengers unknowingly spreading the virus to others in society and ensure that the public’s health always comes first."

Home Office officials are reportedly not sure whether the air bridges plan will be ready by the end of June despite pressure from ministers.

Ministers are reportedly divided over the issue – unsure about risking further damage to the economy post-lockdown.


Rules for the new quarantine will see all arrivals – aside few a few exceptions – required to complete an online form when they arrive in the UK.

They will have to turn over their contact details and the address where they will required to self-isolate for 14 days.

Public Health England will then make random spot-checks on people to make sure they are obeying the quarantine.

Anyone who fails to comply with measures risks prosecution and a potentially unlimited fine.

Foreign nationals could also be deported if they refuse to abide by the quarantine, and Border Force may be able to turn people away on arrival.

Failure to complete the online form when you arrive in the UK is also subject to a £100 fine.

It is feared thousands of travelers infected with coronavirus entered the UK in the early days of the pandemic, streaming in from hotspots such as Italy and China.

Public health experts have warned the idea of an air bridge may be impossible for the UK this summer as concerns loom it is not safe.

Gary McLean, a professor in molecular immunology at London Metropolitan University, told the Guardian the Government making a U-turn will impact how people obey the rules.

He said: "This is yet another initiative that is going to be open to interpretation, open to abuse, and the government is back-pedalling over pressure internally within the Tory party, within business,  and it seems to be a political decision, not a health decision."

European countries Brits could soon jet to for a holiday

  • France is opening the borders for Brits from June 15
  • Greece announced British tourists could also travel there from June 15
  • Italy is set to welcome UK travellers from tomorrow (June 3)
  • Portugal has announced they want tourists back from June 6
  • And Spain will be a destination many Brits are keen to get back to, but at the minute it is unclear when they would be allowed into the country

David Hunter, professor of epidemiology at Oxford University, said the "dynamic" situation with the pandemic also makes the air bridges hard to manage.

He said: "If the countries agree and the rules are clear and the contingencies are clear, then at least people know what they could be in for, whereas if it’s all vague then it’s a bigger risk.”

The professor added: "Air bridges between countries with similar Covid risks make sense, if it’s in the interests of both countries.

"When it’s asymmetric, it’s not obvious how that would work."


Health Secretary Matt Hancock has already said the government is considering relaxing the border rules before they have even come into force.

During the No.10 briefing, Mr Hancock said he was growing "more optimistic" about the return of summer holidays.

However, he added: "Clearly the number one priority is keeping the public safe.”

During the press conference Mr Shapps also assured measures will be reviewed "every few weeks" to see if Britain can open up to tourists.

He said: "We are working to see how we can introduce agreements with other countries when safe to do so, so we can go abroad and tourists can come here.”

It comes as 300 business chiefs urged the government to ditch the "unworkable, ill-thought out" quarantine plan.

George Morgan-Grenville, the chief executive of Red Savannah, who is leading the campaign, said: "The findings are catastrophic for the UK economy and for the travel and hospitality sector.

"By pursuing its quarantine plans without due regard for the economic consequences, the Government is choosing to ignore the devastation it will cause to companies, to employment and to the lives of all those whose jobs will be lost.

"The quarantine measures are a blunt weapon which will bring only economic disaster."

Some European nations – such as Italy and Spain – are already planning to open up their borders in the coming months.

Portugal has said it was ready to welcome back Brits within days because it reportedly believes the UK has coronavirus "under control".

France will also open up the border to Brits from June 15, while Italy is keen to kickstart the tourism there – now allowing travelers in.

Meanwhile Greece’s tourism minister Harry Theocharis told the Daily Mail the epidemic was moving “in the right direction” in the UK and coronavirus restrictions for Britons would be lifted from June 15.

A Home Office spokesperson said: “Our priority will always be to protect the public’s health and these new measures are being introduced to do exactly this.

"This quarantine system is designed to keep the transmission rate down, stop new cases being brought in from abroad and help prevent a devastating second wave of coronavirus. All of our decisions have been based on the latest scientific evidence.

“We are supporting businesses in the tourism sector through one of the most generous economic packages provided anywhere in the world and we will continue to look at options to increase international travel, when it is safe to do so, as we move forward.”


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MEAT and greet! UK set for a 77F scorcher today as barbecues resume

MEAT and greet! Britain is set for a 77F scorcher today when thousands will break out the barbecues as lockdown is eased allowing groups of six to meet

  • Pupils in Reception are set to head back to school this morning as are children in classes One and Six 
  • Vulnerable people who were advised to stay indoors during pandemic are allowed to go outside again 
  • Horseracing is set to resume at Newcastle Racecourse with no spectators as mass gatherings are banned 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Britain is set for a 77F scorcher today as thousands are breaking out barbecues due to lockdown being eased with the Government allowing groups of six to meet.

Restrictions across the country are lifting today as schools reopen for Reception as well as years One and Six and outdoor markets reopen along with car showrooms.

Horse racing will resume at Newcastle Racecourse but there will be no spectators present at the venue as mass gatherings remain banned.

And vulnerable people who have until now been advised to stay indoors due to the coronavirus pandemic will be permitted to go outside. 

The heat is set to rise to 84F  (29C) tomorrow, with temperatures remaining high until the middle of the week when they will level out. 

It comes after tombstoners were spotted in Plymouth and Dorset yesterday as thousands of Britons flouted lockdown by flocking to beaches ahead the government officially easing restrictions tomorrow.

Thrill-seekers ignored clear warnings and plunged 200ft off the cliffs at Dorset’s famous Durdle Door beach today less than 24 hours after four divers were injured at the same point.

Thousands of lockdown-weary families hit Britain’s parks and beaches to lap up the 75F (24C) heat despite government pleas for restraint, with Professor Jonathan Van-Tam asking the public ‘not to tear the pants out of’ the new rules during yesterday’s national press briefing. 

Dominic Raab today warned that a second UK lockdown could be imposed if there is an ‘uptick’ in cases after Britons are allowed to meet up to six people from different households, have barbecues and go to fitness classes once more. 

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2 million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines, from tomorrow.  

Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will come as a release to the largely-elderly shielding population.

People sunbathe on the beach looking east towards the i360 in Hove, on the south coast of England on May 31, 2020 on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules 

People gather together at Richmond Falls beauty spot on the River Swale, North Yorkshire on Sunday as they enjoy the sunny weather

Durdle Door in Dorset is filled with visitors this afternoon, despite four people being injured and the air ambulance being called on yesterday

A man is pictured jumping from Durdle Door today despite warnings after people were injured yesterday and the council closing the beach 


People continue to dive from Durdle Door on Sunday, despite warnings from the council telling visitors not to do so 

Tombstoners have also been spotted leaping into the water along Plymouth’s seafront today, despite four people injured in Dorset on Saturday

Pictured: People take to Durdle Door and dive off today despite the council warning that it is shut for safety reasons 

People are pictured descending on the beach at Durdle Door, Dorset, despite the council warning that it is closed today 


The coastguard is out patrolling at Durdle Door today. The Dorset beach is packed with visitors, despite the air ambulance landing at the beach yesterday

People were spotted jumping into the water at Three Shires Head on the River Dane in Cheshire on Sunday afternoon

There is no room for social distancing as umbrellas line Bournemouth beach on Sunday afternoon 

Bourton-on-the-Water in the Cotswolds is packed with visitors this afternoon as families visit the banks of its river 

Tombstoners were seen leaping from rocks and the bridge that crosses the River Dane on Sunday afternoon 

Brighton’s beaches were a popular choice for sunseekers looking to soak up the rays this weekend. Most beach-goers appear to be a safe two-metres apart from others 

A large number of police officers were seen patrolling Richmond Falls in North Yorkshire to ensure visitors maintained social distancing rules

People were seen gathering at Richmond Falls in North Yorkshire as they soaked up the sun on this scorching weekend

Two people rescued after aircraft crashes into water in Southampton 

A pilot and a passenger had to be rescued by the coastguard after their light aircraft crashed into the sea in Southampton.

The coastguard said the pair – who were both onboard the aircraft – were found by a nearby vessel at Calshot Spit. 

A large parachute could be seen attached to the back of the wreckage, suggesting it was deployed when the aircraft got into trouble.

An emergency responder can be heard telling onlookers to ‘clear the beach’.

The plane could be seen on the shore in Southampton. It lay belly-up and appeared to be washed up

In a tweet on Sunday, the Coastguard wrote: ‘HM Coastguard is dealing with an ongoing incident at Calshot Spit, where we are aware that an aircraft went down into the water.

‘Two people were onboard the aircraft and both people have been rescued.

‘They were located by a nearby vessel.’

No details on the condition of the rescued people were given.

Speaking at today’s Downing Street press briefing, Robert Jenrick said the Government will review the risks to the clinically extremely vulnerable as part of each review of social distancing measures for the wider population.

The Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government said the next review of shielding measures will take place in the week beginning on June 15.

Of the new guidance which allows people to spend time outdoors, he said: ‘This will enable those shielding to see loved ones like children and grandchildren, something many I know are aching to do.

‘Having spent many weeks indoors some will understandably be very cautious and concerned about going outdoors. You should only do what you are comfortable with.’

He added: ‘If the conditions become less favourable our advice to those being asked to shield will unfortunately need to be tightened. 

‘The Government will continue to ensure that support is available to those who need it for as long as possible and for as long as people are advised to follow the shielding guidance.’

He said, while the updated guidance from Monday for the shielded is for England only, the Government is working closely with the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ‘who will issue their own guidance in due course’.

It comes as the RNLI is facing demands to bring its lifeguards back after four tombstoners were injured in Dorset. 

Just sixteen beach patrols out of a possible 248 have been reinstated prompting furious backlash by sunseekers eagerly flocking to picturesque coastal spots.

Some lifeguards have started patrolling for free but without the RNLI’s backing they don’t have access to official lifesaving equipment, The Times reports.  

Hundreds have joined the #ReturnToShore campaign, with one saying ‘The RNLI lifeguard service is the only emergency service which did not continue during the pandemic. Why?’

  • Boris Johnson has issued a stern rebuke to his aide Dominic Cummings, warning that he ‘will not tolerate’ another media firestorm. The Prime Minister has ordered his top adviser to stay firmly out of the public eye following the crisis caused by his lockdown trip from London to Durham. 
  • Restless Britons on Satruday brushed aside warnings from police and scientists and were tempted outdoors by scorching temperatures, which climbed to highs of 82F 
  • Britain recorded 215 more Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, taking the official number of coronavirus victims to 38,376 – but it is the lowest Saturday total since lockdown began; 
  • Three SAGE scientists warned over the weekend that the lockdown is being lifted too quickly 
  • Thousands of sunbathers were forced to cram together at Durdle Door today as air ambulance helicopters were called to reports of three people seriously injured after jumping off cliffs into the sea 
  • A long, hot summer could help curb the spread of Covid-19, according to a top epidemiologist.. 

Speaking at today’s Downing Street press briefing, Robert Jenrick (pictured) said the Government will review the risks to the clinically extremely vulnerable as part of each review of social distancing measures for the wider population

Brits have been warned to take the easing of lockdown measures slowly, but Bournemouth beach shows families and other visitors squeezing together

Three Shires Head on the River Dane is attracting visitors during the warm weather on Sunday 

Britons enjoying the good weather at Ruislip Lido in London, as the public are being reminded to practice social distancing following the relaxation of lockdown restrictions

Crowds have flocked to Bournemouth beach on England’s south coast ahead of lockdown measures being eased on Monday

Sunbathers are out in force on Brighton Beach today on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules

Gulls flock above sunbathers on the beach in Brighton as Britain enjoys roasting 75F (24C) summer heat

Paddleboarders exercise social-distancing while afloat in the calm sea off Brighton – as thousands cram Britain’s beauty spots to soak up the day’s 75F (24C) heat

Ruislip Lido in London is packed today with social distancing appearing almost forgotten ahead of the more lockdown restrictions being eased by the government tomorrow 

People fill the beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, today despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public 

Brighton sunbathers soak up the 75F (24c) rays today on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules.

Topless cyclists ride along the Mall in London today as the parks across the city are packed with lockdown-wearing Britons soakin gup the 75F (24C) sun

Large groups, mainly of young people, continue to breach the existing rules and even the eased rules coming in to force tomorrow, in Clapham Common, South London

People enjoy the sun on Clapham Common after the Government eased restrictions and allowed people to meet from Monday

Many seem to be jumping the gun on, and exceeding, the new rules for meeting groups that come into force tomorrow as they enjoy the sun in Brockwell Park, South London

A group enjoy a drink in close proximity and take a selfie while not social distancing in Clapham common, south London

A tombstoner can be seen plummeting towards the sea after vaulting from the top of the ancient limestone arch known as Durdle Door in Dorset

A member of the coastguard looks over a packed beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public 

Police patrol the cliff top near Durdle Door, Lulworth, after Dorset Council announced that the beach was closed to the public after three people were seriously injured jumping off cliffs into the sea

Members of HM Coastguard Search and Rescue at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed to the public after three people were seriously injured jumping off cliffs into the sea 

One RNLI lifeguard, who has started patrolling on a voluntary basis, said: ‘It feels as though the RNLI bosses don’t have our back. We’re volunteering with minimal equipment and at far greater risk.’  

From Monday, groups of up to six people will be able to meet outside in England as long as they observe social distancing as part of efforts to fight coronavirus.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said today: ‘This is a sensitive moment. We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition.’

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky News’ Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’ 

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset and walk the path to the beach at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine  

Inconsiderate visitors left this rubbish at the beach next to Durdle Door and the council warned people to stay away today following dangerous jumping yesterday  

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine despite officials warning them to stay away 

Visitors begin to arrive at the beach at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine

Visitors begin to arrive at Durdle Door at Lulworth in Dorset at the start of another day of scorching hot sunshine with sunbathers heading to the beauty spot despite warnings not to do so 

Congestion levels in Southampton over the weekend show a 27 per cent rise in traffic from last week, suggesting more cars are heading to towards sea side towns

Congestion data for Bournemouth showed a 14 per cent rise in traffic over last week, while London only saw three per cent more traffic on last week

The number of cars on the road in Southampton over the weekend was up 27 per cent from last week, suggesting more traffic is heading to towards sea side towns.

While congestion data for Bournemouth showed a 14 per cent rise in traffic over last week, while London and Birmingham only saw a three per cent rise in traffic this weekend compared to last week.  

Liverpool saw 12 per cent more cars on the road this weekend verses last weekend while traffic in Manchester was up four per cent on last weekend. 

Yesterday a picturesque beach was trashed by revellers who left beer bottles, rubbish and laughing has cannisters strewn across the sand.

Formby beach in Merseyside was covered with litter on Saturday, despite pleas from police to continue social distancing.

In a statement the force said: ‘We are also asking people to remain respectful and protect our public spaces.

‘In recent days we have received reports of excessive littering and fires and BBQs being lit as well as people parking illegally and inconsiderately by blocking driveways and residential roads.’  

Despite the crowds being forced to group together following Saturday’s incident, people continue to flock to Durdle Door today

People make their way down the steps to the beach at Durdle Door, near Lulworth, today despite Dorset Council announcing that the beach was closed 

Crowds have returned to Durdle Door today after the air ambulance was called to the Dorset beach on Saturday afternoon

Pictured: Grassholme Reservoir in County Durham today as temperatures across the country soar while lockdown restrictions are still in place  

People have taken to Brighton beach today with lockdown rules still in place as groups practised social distancing at the seaside 

Sunseekers are pictured on Brighton beach today as the UK prepares to further ease lockdown rules tomorrow and temperatures soar 

People sunbathe on the beach in front of the derelict West Pier in Brighton, on the south coast of England on May 31, 2020 on the eve of a further relaxation of the novel coronavirus lockdown rules 

People enjoy the sunshine on a beach at Ruislip Lido at a reservoir in Ruislip, Britain, 31 May 2020 amid soaring temperatures 

People apply suncream in the sunshine on a beach at Ruislip Lido at a reservoir in Ruislip, Britain, 31 May 2020 with the south-east experiencing a surge in temperatures 

Dominic Raab admits lockdown will need to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’ in coronavirus cases

Dominic Raab today defended easing coronavirus lockdown in England despite a chorus of warnings about a second spike – but admitted that curbs will have to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’.

The Foreign Secretary acknowledged the loosening that takes effect tomorrow is a ‘sensitive moment’, but insisted the government was making sensible changes to get the country back up and running.

‘We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition,’ he said. 

Mr Raab played down fears that the curbs are being downgraded even though the government’s own coronavirus alert system level remains at four – which suggests they should stay in place.

And he stressed that ministers would not hesitate to reimpose restrictions in ‘localities’ or ‘settings’ if the number of cases begins to flare up again. 

But the Westminster government is facing a wave of opposition to the relaxation from scientists who say an increase in cases is ‘inevitable’, while Nicola Sturgeon has stressed she is being more ‘cautious’ and the virus can still ‘run out of control’.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab (pictured today) said the government would not hesitate to act as he defended the decision to loosen draconian restrictions

A series of experts have raised concern about the moved to ease the lockdown in England, which takes effect from tomorrow, with the UK still getting 8,000 new infections a day.

Up to six people from six different households will be permitted to meet up in public places or gardens, meaning exercise classes and barbecues are back on the agenda. 

Primary schools and nurseries have also been told they can start to reopen, while all non-essential shops can return from June 15. 

In Scotland and Wales the loosening is far less dramatic, with only two households allowed to meet up at a time and people told not to travel more than five miles from home. Schools north of the border will not be back until after holidays there in August.    

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’  

Families across England will finally be able to see their elderly relatives again tomorrow, as millions of vulnerable people ‘shielding’ are allowed to spend time outdoors.

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines. Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will bring joy to thousands.

Boris Johnson today hailed the ‘resilience’ of those who have been shielding since March, with many having no face-to-face contact since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Prime Minister said: ‘I want to thank everyone who has followed the shielding guidance – it is because of your patience and sacrifice that thousands of lives have been saved. 

‘I do not underestimate just how difficult it has been for you, staying at home for the last ten weeks, and I want to pay tribute to your resilience.’

Meanwhile, Nicola Sturgeon today accused England of under-reporting care home deaths as she swiped at Mr Johnson for easing lockdown too early.

The Scottish First Minister said the apparent higher proportion of victims in care homes north of the border was due to the way they are recorded.

She insisted that people who died of stroke and ‘happened’ to have coronavirus were counted in the numbers in Scotland – whereas they were not in England, meaning that there was ‘under-reporting’.

Asked on Sky News whether she thought that the PM was loosening the lockdown in England too quickly, Ms Sturgeon insisted she did not want to ‘criticise other politicians’ and they were all ‘trying to do the right things’.  

But she pointedly said that in Scotland they were being ‘very cautious’. ‘This virus has not gone away,’ she said. ‘That is why in Scotland we are moving very slowly.’  

Prof Devi Sridhar, who has been advising the Scottish government, warned it looks ‘inevitable’ that cases will rise again in England. 

‘I’m very sorry to say that I think it is right now inevitable looking at the numbers,’ she told Sky.

‘The only thing that might in a sense save England is the good weather and warmth if this virus does indeed die outside quite quickly, but it’s incredibly worrying because the numbers are not low enough to have a testing and tracing system take over.’

‘If your objective is to contain the virus, to drive numbers down and to try to in a sense get rid of it so no-one is exposed to it, then it is not the right measure right now to open up,’ she said.

‘It’s a big risk and gamble for exiting lockdown with a larger number of deaths than we did when we actually entered lockdown months back.’

Prof Sridhar said there was now a clear divide between Government and some scientists, but added that ultimately decisions will be made by politicians.

She said: ‘I think what they should be saying is they consider the science, and hopefully they listen to it but the decision, and who actually has the accountability, are the politicians and leaders.’

Professor Peter Openshaw, who sits on the the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) to the Government, said people must proceed with ‘great caution’ as the lockdown is eased.

He told the BBC’s Andrew Marr programme: ‘At the moment, we still have quite a large number of cases out there in the community and I think unlocking too fast carries a great risk that all the good work that’s been put in by everyone, to try to reduce transmission may be lost. So we do need to proceed with great, great care at this point.’

Asked if the Government is going too fast, he said: ‘I think there is a pretty unanimous message now that we need to take this slowly and go step by step. We need to evaluate the effect of each step before we move to the next one. 

‘I don’t hear any great dissent amongst the amongst the advisers who are speaking in public at the moment.’

He said it will be around two or three weeks before the effects of the latest easing of restrictions is known.

He told the Marr show: ‘It’s going to be very patchy, it may be that actually easing lockdown is perfectly OK in areas like London which were hit early and hit hard, and where the epidemic seems to have been virtually passed in many parts of the community, with a few exception.

‘But up north it’s still a very large number of cases. I think we need to be more subtle about the geography and we need to look at the particular areas where it may be appropriate to ease lockdown.’

He added: ‘Maybe there needs to be a bit more subtlety to the way in which lockdown is eased.’ 

Prof Openshaw also said he believed advice on who needs to shield can be ‘fine tuned’ to prevent people being kept at home unnecessarily. 

Mr Johnson (pictured in Downing Street this morning) has announced that the lockdown restrictions will be eased slightly in England from tomorrow

‘I think we’re going to be able to fine-tune the advice now and actually reassure some people who we feared might be susceptible, that in fact they’re not as vulnerable as we thought. So that’s really good news,’ he said. 

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, the government’s chief science officer Sir Patrick Vallance explained Sage was only there to advise politicians, who have the final say on what to do with evidence presented to them. 

He wrote: ‘Science advice to Cobr and to ministers needs to be direct and given without fear or favour. But it is advice. Ministers must decide and have to take many other factors into consideration.’

The chair of Sage explained the advisory board was not infallible, writing: ‘There is a range of opinions in all of discussions and there is wide reading of the latest research, but what Sage endeavours to do is come down to a position or a range of positions, to provide options ministers could consider and explain the uncertainties and assumptions inherent in that science and evidence.’ 

Unions today insisted summer holidays should not be cancelled because teachers have been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown.

Despite the loss of face-to-face lessons, Mary Bousted, general secretary of the National Education Union, said her members deserved the time off.

She said any headteachers looking to recuperate lessons, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

In a broadside to government the trade union chief also slammed the government’s decision to re-open schools on June 1, saying if they had waited until June 15 the infection rate could have been halved. 

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from south London, Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise.

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again.

The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders. 

They may be off because they suffer from health conditions including asthma and diabetes, live with a vulnerable family member or because they are at heightened risk due to their age.

They also found eleven out of the country’s 20 worst performing councils on tests have told head teachers to keep the gates bolted.

The government plans to get Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils back to school on Monday, with an ambition to then get Year 10 and 12 back in lessons on June 15.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all pushed back their school start dates.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson sought to calm concerned parents today, writing in the Sun on Sunday that pupils will not be allowed to gather in groups larger than 15.

He also assured parents it would be safe, saying ‘strict safety measures’ have been put in place to protect children.

Referring to a Government adviser, Mr Raab said: ‘As Jonathan Van-Tam … has said, with a precarious moment we can ease up, we can protect life, but also livelihoods, get life back to something resembling normal, but we must monitor it very carefully,

‘If there is any up-tick in the number of cases, if we stop making the progress I described, we will have to take further measures again and target the virus wherever it may appear.’

Beach-goers were crammed together to make room for air ambulances to land at Durdle Door in Dorset yesterday after four people injured themselves jumping off cliffs into the sea. 

The four unidentified jumpers vaulted from the top of the ancient limestone arch, which reaches 200ft at its highest point, and are in critical condition, according to Dorset Police.  


Pictured: Today’s weather forecast from the Met Office as temperatures are set to climb even higher this afternoon 

Images from the scene show a mass of sun-seekers crammed into one area, near the only available exit, as they try to vacate the area as the air ambulance lands.  

‘Don’t tear the pants out of lockdown’  

England’s deputy chief medical officer yesterday pleaded with Britons ‘not to tear the pants out of’ the loosened lockdown when more freedoms are granted on Monday.  

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam warned that abusing new liberties would fuel the spread of infection and said that the lifting of curbs should be treated as if gently lifting the lid on a coiled spring – ‘painstakingly’ slow.   

He told yesterday’s Downing Street press conference: ‘This is a very dangerous moment – we have to get this right. People have to be sensible and proportionate with their freedoms.’ 

Despite initially claiming that only three people were hurt jumping off the famous archway, it emerged last night that the figure is one higher.  

Mark Dowie, the RNLI’s chief executive, wrote an open letter asking the government to restrict beach access before ‘more lives are lost’.

But former Conservative MP Charlotte Leslie says that the RNLI could fun a full £20million lifeguard service from the £124m in crisis funds that it reported in 2018. 

The organisation says that using such funds is not a long-term solution and the group expects a £45million shortfall this year.  

Police, the ambulance service, the coastguard and the RNLI attended the Dorset beauty spot on Saturday afternoon.

Videos posted on social media show people climbing and leaping from the arch at the site, which is 200ft high.

Air ambulances landed at the scene and crowds of people were evacuated from the beach and surrounding cliff area. Dorset Police confirmed that three people had sustained serious injuries and were receiving medical treatment.

That evening, Dorset Council said Durdle Door and Lulworth Cove would be closed ‘until further notice’. On Sunday morning, the council tweeted that the roads to the popular sites remained closed.

‘You will not be able to visit the beaches there and will be asked to turn around if you try and access the villages,’ the council said. 

People social distance whilst waiting for their morning coffee at the Plymouth Hoe in Devon today as temperatures soar 

People are pictured off the coast at Plymouth Hoe in Devon as sunseekers take to the sea and beach in rising temperatures 

It said the measure would be reviewed on Monday but urged people to avoid the area ‘for now’. Dorset Police tweeted: ‘Durdle Door and Lulworth Cove remain closed today along with approach roads to the area. Please do not travel as you will be turned away.’

On Saturday, a post on Poole Police’s Facebook page said the ‘critical incident’ had involved people jumping from the arch of Durdle Door into the sea.

Man in his 30s dies and two people are rescued after fishing boat sinks a mile off the Lancashire coast 

A man in his 30s has died and two others were rescued from the water after a boat sunk off the coast of Lancashire.

A vessel – thought to be a decommissioned fishing boat – got into trouble about a mile from the coast of Fleetwood.

A man went down with the boat and his body was later found by the RNLI.

The coastguard dispatched two lifeboats, the Shannon class 13-07 and the in-shore D class.

Two men – aged 70 and 71 – were picked up by support vessel Eden Rose from the local wind farm.

A man in his 30s has died and two others were rescued from the water after a boat sunk off the coast of Fleetwood, Lancashire (stock image pictured)

The men were taken back to shore by the Shannon class vessel before being rushed to hospital as a precaution after suffering from shock and the effects of the cold water.

The Shannon class vessel then returned to look for the missing man along with the Coastguard helicopter. 

The coastguard dispatched two lifeboats, the Shannon class 13-07 and the in-shore D class (stock image pictured)

 

‘The arch of Durdle Door is approximately 200 feet in height. Hitting water from that height, roughly 77mph, can be critical,’ it said.

‘This is further compounded by tides, currents and altering depth of the sea bed. It is NOT an appropriate location for this type of activity.’

Meanwhile, people were slammed for running around naked and causing harassment on a popular quayside, have caused a pub to shutdown.

The rising levels of anti social behaviour on The Quay in Exeter, Devon, has led to the Prospect Inn closing down its takeaway service.

The pub said: ‘WE ARE DONE. The anti social behaviour on the Quay worsens day by day, but Friday night was the final straw: abuse, harassment, urination and public nudity.’

Tories today slammed ‘hard-left’ unions opposing the reopening of schools amid claims a fifth of staff will stay off tomorrow.

The National Education Union (NEU) was accused of ‘chasing headlines’ by resisting the ‘phased and cautious’ plans to get pupils back in the classroom.   

The row came as general secretary Mary Bousted dismissed the idea of making up for lost time during the summer holidays, saying her members had been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown and deserved a break.

She said any headteachers looking to lay on catch-up classes, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again. The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders.

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from her home in south London, Ms Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise. 

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

 

Dominic Raab today defended easing coronavirus lockdown in England despite a chorus of warnings about a second spike – but admitted that curbs will have to be tightened again if there is an ‘uptick’.

The Foreign Secretary acknowledged the loosening that takes effect tomorrow is a ‘sensitive moment’, but insisted the government was making sensible changes to get the country back up and running.

Spain and Greece warn Britons will NOT be welcome when airlines return to the skies 

Airlines are plotting a major return to the skies come July, amid growing speculation that the government will ease its quarantine measures for international arrivals – but two summer hotspots may not allow Brits to visit.

British Airways, EasyJet and RyanAir have announced thousands of redundancies after the coronavirus lockdown grounded most of their flights in March.

But as domestic lockdown measures ease, companies are now scheduling more than 160,000 passenger flights from July, with room for 29.5million passengers, according to The Sunday Telegraph. 

Heathrow Airport has been empty in May compared to previous years, but airline companies are now planning a return to service in July, should quarantine measures be eased

Home Secretary Priti Patel’s quarantine plan, which from June 8 will require anyone entering the UK to self-isolate for two weeks, appeared to torpedo Britons’ hopes of a European summer holiday.

But there are rumblings the government could change its plan when the quarantine is reviewed on June 29.  

A senior industry source told The Telegraph: ‘The sense is that they might quietly do a U-turn after the first review period. Grant Shapps [Transport Secretary] is against quarantine, the Treasury are against it, Beis is against it and DCMS hate it.’

‘We can’t just stay in lockdown forever. We have got to transition,’ he said. 

Mr Raab played down fears that the curbs are being downgraded even though the government’s own coronavirus alert system level remains at four – which suggests they should stay in place.

And he stressed that ministers would not hesitate to reimpose restrictions in ‘localities’ or ‘settings’ if the number of cases begins to flare up again. 

But the Westminster government is facing a wave of opposition to the relaxation from scientists who say an increase in cases is ‘inevitable’, while Nicola Sturgeon has stressed she is being more ‘cautious’ and the virus can still ‘run out of control’. 

A series of experts have raised concern about the moved to ease the lockdown in England, which takes effect from tomorrow, with the UK still getting 8,000 new infections a day.

Up to six people from six different households will be permitted to meet up in public places or gardens, meaning exercise classes and barbecues are back on the agenda. 

Primary schools and nurseries have also been told they can start to reopen, while all non-essential shops can return from June 15. 

In Scotland and Wales the loosening is far less dramatic, with only two households allowed to meet up at a time and people told not to travel more than five miles from home. Schools north of the border will not be back until after holidays there in August.    

Asked whether the lockdown will be tightened again if infection rates increase, Mr Raab told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday: ‘We will target, if there is any uptick, and it could be in a locality, it could be in a particular setting, we will target very carefully measures that would apply to it so that we can take these steps but also keep control of the virus.’  

Families across England will finally be able to see their elderly relatives again tomorrow, as millions of vulnerable people ‘shielding’ are allowed to spend time outdoors.

As part of the easing of lockdown restrictions, 2.2million vulnerable people will be able to go outside with members of their household, while continuing to follow social distancing guidelines. Those who live alone will be able to meet outside with one other person from another household, in a move that will bring joy to thousands.

Boris Johnson today hailed the ‘resilience’ of those who have been shielding since March, with many having no face-to-face contact since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.

Pictured: The air ambulance helicopter touches down  at Durdle Door on Saturday afternoon before the council today closed the beauty spot due to injuries 

Rowers are pictured on the River Thames near Maidenhead in Berkshire as temperatures soar in the south-east of England 

The Prime Minister said: ‘I want to thank everyone who has followed the shielding guidance – it is because of your patience and sacrifice that thousands of lives have been saved. 

‘I do not underestimate just how difficult it has been for you, staying at home for the last ten weeks, and I want to pay tribute to your resilience.’

Boris Johnson’s SISTER Rachel is accused of flouting lockdown 

Rachel Johnson has been accused of bending lockdown rules by staying at her second home in Notting Hill after finishing her presenting shift at LBC.

Boris Johnson’s younger sister has previously said she is isolating at her home in Exmoor, Somerset, making only essential journeys to Leicester Square in London where she presents an evening show on the talk radio station.

According to The Mirror, instead of travelling four hours back to Somerset on Friday, Ms Johnson instead opted to stay at her second home in Notting Hill, where her two sons live.

Rachel Johnson was seen returning to her home in Notting Hill on Saturday, having stayed the night after a presenting shift on LBC on Friday

It is claimed she travelled back to the Exmoor farm, she shares with her husband and daughter, on Saturday morning by train. 

A Whitehall source told The Mirror: ‘It doesn’t look good for anyone,’ adding: ‘First his friend Dom and now his sister have been caught bending the rules, if not breaking them.’ 

The radio host’s spokesman told The Mirror Ms Johnson ‘sometimes stays over,’ after finishing her show at 7pm.

They added Ms Johnson has keyworker status as she is a broadcaster, saying she stays alert at all times while travelling between her job and her home. 

MailOnline has approached Ms Johnson’s for a full comment. 

 

Meanwhile, Nicola Sturgeon today accused England of under-reporting care home deaths as she swiped at Mr Johnson for easing lockdown too early.

The Scottish First Minister said the apparent higher proportion of victims in care homes north of the border was due to the way they are recorded.

She insisted that people who died of stroke and ‘happened’ to have coronavirus were counted in the numbers in Scotland – whereas they were not in England, meaning that there was ‘under-reporting’.

Asked on Sky News whether she thought that the PM was loosening the lockdown in England too quickly, Ms Sturgeon insisted she did not want to ‘criticise other politicians’ and they were all ‘trying to do the right things’.  

But she pointedly said that in Scotland they were being ‘very cautious’. ‘This virus has not gone away,’ she said. ‘That is why in Scotland we are moving very slowly.’ 

Prof Devi Sridhar, who has been advising the Scottish government, warned it looks ‘inevitable’ that cases will rise again in England. 

‘I’m very sorry to say that I think it is right now inevitable looking at the numbers,’ she told Sky.

‘The only thing that might in a sense save England is the good weather and warmth if this virus does indeed die outside quite quickly, but it’s incredibly worrying because the numbers are not low enough to have a testing and tracing system take over.’

‘If your objective is to contain the virus, to drive numbers down and to try to in a sense get rid of it so no-one is exposed to it, then it is not the right measure right now to open up,’ she said.

‘It’s a big risk and gamble for exiting lockdown with a larger number of deaths than we did when we actually entered lockdown months back.’

Prof Sridhar said there was now a clear divide between Government and some scientists, but added that ultimately decisions will be made by politicians.

She said: ‘I think what they should be saying is they consider the science, and hopefully they listen to it but the decision, and who actually has the accountability, are the politicians and leaders.’

Professor Peter Openshaw, who sits on the the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NERVTAG) to the Government, said people must proceed with ‘great caution’ as the lockdown is eased.

He told the BBC’s Andrew Marr programme: ‘At the moment, we still have quite a large number of cases out there in the community and I think unlocking too fast carries a great risk that all the good work that’s been put in by everyone, to try to reduce transmission may be lost. So we do need to proceed with great, great care at this point.’

Asked if the Government is going too fast, he said: ‘I think there is a pretty unanimous message now that we need to take this slowly and go step by step. We need to evaluate the effect of each step before we move to the next one. 

UK announces official daily Covid-19 death toll of 113 – the lowest since lockdown – taking the official count to 38,489 

The UK has announced 113 more Covid-19 deaths today, the lowest since lockdown began, taking the official count to 38,489. 

Today the Department of Health reported the lowest figure in almost ten weeks – 74 people died on March 23, after which the crisis spiralled out of control.

However, the weekends always see a significant drop in deaths due to a lag in reporting.

Last Sunday health officials declared 118 deaths, which was a 30 per cent drop from the week before.

Today has not seen such a dramatic reduction from the week before. But deaths are still declining from the peak in mid-April when the worst day saw 1,172 people die.

Back-dated data from death certificates shows more than 46,000 people had been killed by the virus by May 15, 36 per cent more than the official toll given by the Department of Health (33,998) at that time. 

If the same mathematical sum was applied to today’s DH count of 38,489, it would suggest the true death toll currently is around the 51,000 mark. 

There have been 274,762 positive test results since the crisis began. But this is a tiny fraction of the millions who would have been infected and never got a test.

DH said that testing capacity reached the Prime Minister’s 200,000 target yesterday, after promises it would be met before June 1, despite only 115,700 tests being conducted.

It said it had reached its 200,000 goal because it had the ‘capacity’ to take 40,000 antibody tests of health workers every day, which detect if a person has already had the infection and recovered. 

The government was accused of ‘bending the rules’ to reach its initial coronavirus testing target of 100,000 per day by the end of April by including home testing kits that had been sent out, but not processed. 

Despite the Prime Minister saying the government’s five tests have been met and it is safe to start relaxing restrictions from tomorrow, the alert level remains at four.

There are still 54,000 new infections happening each week – down from 61,000 per week at the start of May – and 133,000 people are thought to currently have the virus, down from 137,000. This means one in 1,000 people are still catching it.

‘I don’t hear any great dissent amongst the amongst the advisers who are speaking in public at the moment.’

He said it will be around two or three weeks before the effects of the latest easing of restrictions is known.

He told the Marr show: ‘It’s going to be very patchy, it may be that actually easing lockdown is perfectly OK in areas like London which were hit early and hit hard, and where the epidemic seems to have been virtually passed in many parts of the community, with a few exception.

‘But up north it’s still a very large number of cases. I think we need to be more subtle about the geography and we need to look at the particular areas where it may be appropriate to ease lockdown.’

He added: ‘Maybe there needs to be a bit more subtlety to the way in which lockdown is eased.’ 

Prof Openshaw also said he believed advice on who needs to shield can be ‘fine tuned’ to prevent people being kept at home unnecessarily. 

‘I think we’re going to be able to fine-tune the advice now and actually reassure some people who we feared might be susceptible, that in fact they’re not as vulnerable as we thought. So that’s really good news,’ he said. 

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, the government’s chief science officer Sir Patrick Vallance explained Sage was only there to advise politicians, who have the final say on what to do with evidence presented to them. 

He wrote: ‘Science advice to Cobr and to ministers needs to be direct and given without fear or favour. But it is advice. Ministers must decide and have to take many other factors into consideration.’

The chair of Sage explained the advisory board was not infallible, writing: ‘There is a range of opinions in all of discussions and there is wide reading of the latest research, but what Sage endeavours to do is come down to a position or a range of positions, to provide options ministers could consider and explain the uncertainties and assumptions inherent in that science and evidence.’ 

Unions today insisted summer holidays should not be cancelled because teachers have been working ‘flat out’ during lockdown.

Despite the loss of face-to-face lessons, Mary Bousted, general secretary of the National Education Union, said her members deserved the time off.

She said any headteachers looking to recuperate lessons, especially for those pupils going into GCSEs and A levels, should only offer voluntary clubs and activities during the school holidays.

In a broadside to government the trade union chief also slammed the government’s decision to re-open schools on June 1, saying if they had waited until June 15 the infection rate could have been halved. 

Speaking to Sophy Ridge on Sunday from south London, Bousted said: ‘No. The summer holiday shouldn’t be cancelled because teachers have been working flat out to provide education for children at home.

‘So what should happen is, and we do support this, to have clubs and activities on a volunteer basis for those children to meet together to socialise.

‘We don’t think the emphasis should be on catch up because many of those children will need to re-socialise, re-engage and re-engage with a love of learning and be involved in creative activities which enable them to become part of a wider society again and have the desire to learn again.’

Her words came as a fifth of teachers are expected to stay home on Monday when Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils sit behind their desks again. The figure was revealed by a TES survey of 5,000 school leaders. 

They may be off because they suffer from health conditions including asthma and diabetes, live with a vulnerable family member or because they are at heightened risk due to their age.

They also found eleven out of the country’s 20 worst performing councils on tests have told head teachers to keep the gates bolted.

The government plans to get Reception, Year One and Year Six pupils back to school on Monday, with an ambition to then get Year 10 and 12 back in lessons on June 15.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have all pushed back their school start dates.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson sought to calm concerned parents today, writing in the Sun on Sunday that pupils will not be allowed to gather in groups larger than 15. He also assured parents it would be safe, saying ‘strict safety measures’ have been put in place to protect children.

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What happens now GCSE and A-Level exams are cancelled due to coronavirus pandemic? – The Sun


STUDENTS across the UK will not be able to sit their GCSE or A-Level exams this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It leaves pupils concerned over if they will receive grades and whether they will be able to get into their chosen college or university for September.

⚠️ Read our UK schools reopening live blog for the latest news & updates

Why have GCSE and A-Level exams been cancelled?

Pupils will not sit their GCSE and A-Levels in May and June this year due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson announced: "We will not go ahead with assessments or exams and we will not be publishing performance tables this academic year."

The move to shut schools came a fortnight before kids were meant to break up for the Easter break.

When will school students be able to sit their exams?

Currently, students will be given a predicted grade based on coursework, mock exams and teacher assessments.

The government is working with Ofqual (Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) on a "detailed set of measures that make sure that no child is unfairly penalised", Mr Williamson added.

The National Education Union has suggested teacher assessment is a "good method of giving reliable information about young people's progress and achievements".

GCSE and A-Level results are set to be handed out before August.

Students will also have the opportunity to take exams in autumn if they wish to.

What happens now for the rest of the year?

It remains unclear as to whether schools will reopen for normal service before the summer holidays.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to reveal lockdown changes on Sunday May 10 – some of which could come into effect from Monday.

But any return is expected to be staggered, with the younger age groups likely to go back first to allow parents to return to work.

At the moment, schools in England and Wales are shut except for looking after the children of keyworkers (eg NHS staff) and vulnerable children.

Those at home have been able to access learning resources online with many families reverting to homeschooling during the pandemic.

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Who Are Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's Celebrity Neighbors?

Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex are settling into their new lives as free agents. The two gave up their lives as senior members of the royal family in favor of more independence earlier this year and spent several months narrowing down a new home base before ultimately deciding on Meghan’s home state of California.

Unfortunately, their move was overshadowed by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the couple has been locked down for several months, waiting out the worst of the outbreak. Still, Meghan and Prince Harry likely aren’t bored while staying at home, especially since they are reportedly surrounded by some of the world’s biggest celebrities.

Why did Meghan Markle and Prince Harry decide to live in L.A.?

RELATED: Prince William and Kate Middleton Reportedly Miss Prince Harry More Than Meghan Markle But Here’s Why It’s Normal

In January, the royal family, as well as the world, was rocked by the announcement that Meghan and Prince Harry intended to step down as senior members of the royal family. They would no longer be “working royals,” traveling the world to represent the queen. In their announcement, which they posted to their Instagram page, the couple stated that they wanted to pursue their own interests, including founding their own charity and making their own income.

Many royal followers wondered where the couple would settle since they had been spending the majority of their holiday break in Canada. There was some speculation that Meghan and Prince Harry would divide their time between Canada and the United Kingdom.

However, the couple shocked everyone when it was revealed that they would be making their new home primarily in Los Angeles. While they did not reveal their reasons for the move to California, many have assumed that it is so that they can be close to Doria Ragland, Meghan’s mother. Los Angeles also provides the pair with plenty of opportunities for work in television and film, an industry close to Meghan’s heart. 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are surrounded by celebrities

During the first several months of Meghan and Prince Harry’s residency in LA, fans had no idea where the couple had decided to set up shop — other than that it was somewhere exclusive and very private.

Recently, however, it was revealed that the two have been living in a mansion owned by the prestigious film producer Tyler Perry. The spacious mansion reportedly has eight bedrooms, access to a private walking trail, a large chef’s kitchen, and twelve bathrooms.

Perry isn’t the only connection to celebrity culture that Meghan and Prince Harry are currently enjoying. According to a recent report, the couple is virtually surrounded by A-list celebrities. The mansion where they are staying is close to residences owned by Cameron Diaz, Samuel L. Jackson, Sylvester Stallone, Adele, Katy Perry, and Sir Elton John, who is a good friend to both Prince Harry and Meghan.

Not only does this ultra-private location guarantee the couple privacy, but it grants them easy access to the biggest stars in the business. 

Is Prince Harry settling into his new life?

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In Scotland today, The Duke of Sussex and Travalyst have hosted a summit to launch their next phase of work, putting communities first, with a mission to create a more sustainable tourism industry. • “We are a coalition of partners with a shared goal to transform the future of tourism and travel for everyone – to give people access to better information and ensure the future development of tourism positively supports the destinations that the industry relies on, and that their communities depend on. We believe travel is a good thing. It is the heart of human experience, of cultural connections and of new friendships.” – The Duke of Sussex Travalyst is working to build a future where people are able to take holidays and trips that have social, environmental and economic benefits to communities and destinations built in. There is an increasing desire for these types of trips – and we want to make them a reality for everyone. At today’s summit in Edinburgh, representatives from across the Scottish tourism sector discussed the need to encourage and incentivise sustainable practices across the supply chain, in a way that meets the needs of consumers who want more clarity on how to choose more sustainable options. Image © PA / SussexRoyal

A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal) on

Many fans of pop culture might consider Meghan and Prince Harry’s new home to be a veritable paradise. However, several reports have claimed that the redheaded royal is struggling, and hasn’t settled as easily into California life as he might have hoped.

Even Dr. Jane Goodall, a close personal friend of Prince Harry, revealed in a recent interview that he was finding things “a bit challenging.” 

It is unclear if the couple plans to stay in LA for the long-term, or are only staying in the state temporarily. One thing is clear, they are certainly experiencing A-list life in their exclusive neighborhood. 

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David and Victoria Beckham 'plan to build secret escape tunnel' at their £6m Cotswolds mansion

DAVID and Victoria Beckham are "planning to build an secret escape tunnel" at their £6m Cotswolds mansion after a spate of break-ins at posh pads.

The reported plans come after footballer Dele Alli was robbed at knifepoint at his North London home and Robbie Williams spoke about his burglary fears.

According to documents obtained by the Express, the Beckhams are planning an underground link between their home and garage, as well as a wine cellar.

Planning agents for the property said: "The proposed development includes a new basement cellar constructed beneath the extension to the existing garage outbuilding with a linked walkway.

"The basement cellar beneath is for storage of wine and the proposed use of the outbuilding is solely in association with the main dwelling house, it will improve security for the occupants of the property.

"The proposed [garage] extension adds three new bays to the existing garage outbuilding, increasing the building from four bays to seven."


Meanwhile, the stunning Cotswolds retreat was a Grade II-listed farmhouse that was converted into the sprawling mansion-like building.

Purchased in December 2016 for a reported £6.15million, David and Victoria took their youngest children Harper, 8, Romeo, 17, and Cruz, 15, to the country before lockdown was imposed.

Eldest son Brooklyn, 21, is spending the pandemic with girlfriend Nicola Peltz.


The Beckhams can boast a lengthy property portfolio featuring a London townhouse, Dubai beach property and Miami penthouse.

Home comforts abound inside their Cotswold abode with chandeliers and an enormous roaring fireplace.

The kitchen hosts long tables, gorgeous stone floors and an Aga oven, leading to a vast outdoor eating area to match the one inside.

A tennis court can be found outside with a garden that holds a plunge pool.

Meanwhile, today Victoria revealed the Cotswold mansion had suffered a flood.

Taking to Instagram she told fans that she had some water damage after the bathroom tap was left on.

She wrote: "(Had a) minor flooding incident with an overfilled bath."

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Cassie Randolph: Colton and I Will 'Remain a Part of Each Other's Lives'

Their relationship may be over, but their friendship is intact. Cassie Randolph opened up about her plans to stay close to ex Colton Underwood after their split.

“First off, I want to say this is one of the hardest things I have had to share as neither one of us is quite ready to talk about it yet. However, because our relationship is such a public one, our silence on the matter has been speaking for us,” the Bachelor alum, 25, captioned a series of photos with Underwood, 28, via Instagram on Friday, May 29. “Colton and I have broken up, but have decided to remain a part of each others [sic] lives. With all that we have gone through, we have a special bond that will always be there.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/CAyUCMIHAey/

First off, I want to say this is one of the hardest things I have had to share as neither one of us is quite ready to talk about it yet. However, because our relationship is such a public one, our silence on the matter has been speaking for us. Colton and I have broken up, but have decided to remain a part of each others lives. With all that we have gone through, we have a special bond that will always be there. I love Colton very much and have an enormous amount of respect for him. We have both learned and grown so much these past couple years, and will always have each others back. Always.

A post shared byCassie Randolph (@cassierandolph) on

Randolph noted that the strong feelings she had for the Bachelorette alum have not gone away. “I love Colton very much and have an enormous amount of respect for him,” she concluded. “We have both learned and grown so much these past couple years, and will always have each others [sic] back. Always.”

Underwood and the graduate student met during season 23 of The Bachelor, which aired in 2019. They chose not to get engaged at the end of the show, opting to date instead.

The First Time author announced their split via Instagram on Friday. “Its [sic] been a crazy few months to say the least, Cass and I have been doing a lot of self-reflecting,” he wrote. “Sometimes people are just meant to be friends – and that’s okay. We both have grown immensely and been through so much together – so this isn’t the end of our story, it’s the start of a whole new chapter for us.”

Underwood revealed in March that he tested positive for COVID-19, and he documented his journey to recovery while in quarantine with Randolph and her family. The twosome sparked split rumors earlier this month since they were not in the same state anymore or posting about each other on social media.

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Chelsea stars were ‘bored’ and Hazard and Willian suffered under Sarri, admits his former assistant Zola – The Sun

CHELSEA legend Gianfranco Zola says star players Eden Hazard and Willian stagnated under Maurizio Sarri's tactics.

Zola, assistant boss during Sarri's 2018/19 reign, watched as things turned sour and admitted players were tired of the Italian's methods.

Zola told beIn Sports: "They were following everything, but then as the weeks passed due to the repetition and the amount of games they were playing, the players got tired and they also got bored in a way."

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Julianne Hough and Brooks Laich Split After Nearly 3 Years of Marriage

It’s the end of the road for Julianne Hough and Brooks Laich. The couple called it quits after two years of marriage, the pair revealed to People on Friday, May 29.

“We have lovingly and carefully taken the time we have needed to arrive at our decision to separate,” they said in a joint statement. “We share an abundance of love and respect for one another and will continue to lead with our hearts from that place. We kindly request your compassion and respect for our privacy moving forward.”

The pair’s separation comes after Us exclusively reported on April 17 that Hough, 31, and Laich, were “not doing well.” The day before the relationship status update, the former America’s Got Talent judge went for a walk in Los Angeles with actor Ben Barnes amid the coronavirus pandemic.

In January, Us broke the news that the couple “were having problems” in their marriage. However, things were “totally fine” between Hough and Laich by March, as an insider confirmed that they were “working through any issues they previously faced.”

Brooks Laich and Julianne Hough

Hough, 31, and Laich, 36, tied the knot in a romantic ceremony in July 2017 near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. They exchanged their vows before nearly 200 guests, including Hough’s best friend Nina Dobrev, who was also one of the Dancing With the Stars alum’s bridesmaids.

At the start of 2020, Laich shared a cryptic post to Instagram about starting a “new stage” of his life in 2020. “I feel like a lot of my life has been ‘bound’ to certain identities that have come through the sport I spent my life playing. Canadian, male, hockey player, disciplined, competitive, etc…,” Laich, 36, wrote via Instagram on January 7. “And though I am all of those things, they do not define me, and I am not bound by them. In 2020 I look forward to releasing old identities, and stepping into a new chapter in my life.”

Meanwhile, Hough had been spotted without her wedding ring. Most recently, she appeared ringless in an Instagram video she reposted on January 4 of herself discussing her new fitness project, Kinrgy. Weeks before this, she shared a video of herself decorating a Christmas tree sans ring.

Months before, Laich spoke about being ready to become a father on his “How Men Think With Brooks Laich & Gavin DeGraw” podcast in October 2019. He shared that he “wanted to have enough space” in his life to devote the time needed into “being that type of father” he had always envisioned. (He had previously admitted to Us exclusively in June that they were using in vitro fertilization to help “increase” their odds at being able to have a kid on their own.)

“I’m now not an athlete, I’m not playing hockey. So what does life look like now? There’s still a figuring-out process of a new identity for myself,” he said at the time.”Also with my wife, our relationship — it’s a new identity for our relationship as well.”

Hough, for her part, revealed that she doesn’t identify as straight in her September 2019 cover story for Women’s Health. During the interview, she recalled the time she opened up to Laich about how she chose to be with him.

“I think there’s a safety with my husband now that I’m unpacking all of this,” she explained at the time. “There’s no fear of voicing things that I’ve been afraid to admit or that I’ve had shame or guilt about because of what I’ve been told or how I was raised.”

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Who are Sue and Noel Radford and how many children do they have? – The Sun

NOEL and Sue Radford are at the helm of Britain's biggest family.

But who are the couple – who will star with their brood in a new TV show – and how many children do they have?

Who are Sue and Noel Radford?

The couple were both given up for adoption at birth.

Sue, now 45, fell pregnant with Chris at just 14 in 1989 and was determined to keep the baby.

She married Noel, now 49, four years later – and they were soon expecting their second child Sophie.

Just over a year later they learned they were expecting Chloe – and babies have followed in quick succession ever since.

The family do not claim benefits and keep finances afloat through a successful family-owned bakery.

They live in a ten-bed home, which they bought for £240,000 in 2004.

Each day the family consumes 18 pints of milk, three litres of juice and eat three boxes of cereal at breakfast.

Their supermarket trips cost £250 a week and they have outgrown their 15-seater minivan.

In a video on their YouTube channel, they revealed that they are filming a new TV show.

Sue said: “We’re filming for a series at the moment."

Noel added: “It’s a series this time, a three-part.

“We started filming but everything that has been filmed has been by us. They sent all the big cameras, the tripod, the Go-Pros, everything and all the interviews have been done via Zoom.

“I’ve been doing the filming, Luke’s done a bit of the filming so I think when it does go on the telly you will definitely notice it’s not been done professionally.”

It’s not the first time the family has been filmed for TV, and first appeared on Channel 4 in a documentary called '15 kids and counting' in 2012.

Noel added: “We’re not with Channel 4 anymore.”

"Watch this space," Sue added. "We’re not sure when it will be shown. It might be the end of the year, beginning of next year.”

When did Sue Radford last give birth?

Sue gave birth to their 22nd child – a little girl – on April 3, 2020.

Shortly afterwards, they named their daughter Heidie Rose.

She has spent more than 800 weeks of her life pregnant, has sworn this will be her last baby.

How many children do they have?

The Radfords have 22 children.

The couple's children are: including Chris, 30, Sophie, 25, Chloe, 23, Jack, 22, Daniel, 20, Luke, 18, Millie, 17, Katie, 16, James, 15, Ellie, 14, Aimee, 13, Josh, 12, Max, 11, Tillie, nine, Oscar, seven, Casper, six, Hallie, three, Phoebe, two, Archie 18 months, Bonnie, one, and Heidie, one month.

Sadly, the couple's 17th child Alfie was stillborn on July 6, 2014.

Their two eldest children, Chris and Sophie, no longer live at home.

They are also grandparents to Sophie’s three children.

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What is the NHS Test and Trace strategy and how does it work? – The Sun

THE UK'S NHS Test and Trace strategy launches TODAY (May 28, 2020), with hopes that it will pave the way to lifting the coronavirus lockdown.

It is hoped that the pioneering system will help the UK overcome the deadly virus. Here's how it works.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

What is the test, track and trace strategy?

The test, track and trace strategy is one of the key ways in which the UK can exit lockdown and avoid a second wave of coronavirus.

Different to the contract tracing app which is being trialled on the Isle of Wight, the NHS Test and Trace Service will launch with a team of 25,000 contact tracers on May 28.

Anyone who has come into contact with someone who has tested positive for the deadly bug will be told to self-isolate.

It is hoped the test, track and trace system will reduce the spread of the virus by identifying and containing the bug.

Testing

Health Secretary Matt Hancock committed to providing 100,000 tests a day by the end of April.

That target was met, although the figure included kits sent out in the post which had not yet been returned.

However, it dropped back to 85,000 on Sunday, May 3.

Currently, NHS coronavirus tests are available to:

  • Frontline health and social care workers, with or without symptoms
  • Hospital patients and care home residents, with or without symptoms
  • All other essential workers with symptoms
  • Anyone over 65 with symptoms
  • Anyone who goes out to work because they can't work from home and who has symptoms
  • Anyone who has symptoms and lives with someone who meets the above criteria

 

In total, some 25 million people are now eligible for coronavirus testing in the UK.

People can also get tested through the NHS, at temporary drive-through centres, or via satellite testing centres which will be established where there is an urgent need.

Three "mega-labs" have also been set up in Glasgow, Milton Keynes and Cheshire, to boost capacity.

Tracking

To understand how coronavirus spreads through the population, 20,000 households will be recruited and routinely tested over 12 months.

Ultimately, 300,000 participants will be involved in the study.

"High accuracy" antibody tests will be used to understand how immunity could work in those recovering from the disease.

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Those taking part will be swab-tested and asked questions by a health worker during a home visit.

The tests will be repeated every week for five weeks, and then monthly for a year.

In addition, millions of Brits could find out if they've had coronavirus as 100 per cent accurate antibody tests are set to be rolled out this month.

Testing giant Roche Diagnostics has finally created a kit accurate enough to be used at scale – and the firm says it has enough to provide the NHS with hundreds of thousands every week.

Trace

The NHS' digital research division NHSX is developing a smartphone app which will alert people that they have been exposed to someone with coronavirus.

People living on the Isle of Wight are among the first to test out the service – provisionally called “NHS – Covid-19”.

NHS staff on the island will be able to use it before being rolled out to its citizens.

The app will work by using Bluetooth to log when another user’s smartphone has been in close proximity.

If a person develops Covid-19 symptoms, they can report their symptoms to the app and immediately organise a test.

The tech automatically sends out an anonymous alert to other users they may have infected, urging them to self-isolate if necessary – thus stopping further spread.

They will then have the ability to book a coronavirus test.

Experts estimate if 60 per cent of Brits used the app on their phone, then future outbreaks could be prevented.

Contract tracers will interview people who test positive, to find out where they have been and who they have been in contact with.

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