Mother hid in toilet as police swooped on home to arrest druggy son

Terrified mother hid in toilet as 49 police officers surrounded her home to arrest her drug-crazed son, 21, during 12-hour rooftop siege after she told him to move out

  • Curtis Green, 21, flew into a rage when Lorraine, 53, told him he had to move out
  • A court heard Green caused £1,000 of damage to the house in Newport, Gwent
  • He smashed window, mirrors, door and television before clambering on the roof
  • Mrs Green shut herself in the toilet to hide as husband Norman, 63, called police
  • Green jailed for two years, two months and handed three-year restraining order

Curtis Green, 21, flew into a rage when Lorraine, 53, told him it was time to move out of their house in Newport, Gwent, Wales

A terrified mother hid in a toilet when 49 police officers swooped on her home to arrest her drug-crazed son in a 12-hour rooftop siege.

Curtis Green, 21, flew into a rage when Lorraine, 53, told him it was time to move out of their house in Newport, Gwent, south-east Wales.

A court heard Green caused £1,000 of damage by smashing a window, mirrors, door and television before clambering on to the roof of their large detached house.

Mrs Green locked herself in the downstairs toilet to hide away as her husband Norman, 63, called police.

Prosecutor Suzanne Payne said: ‘His father begged officers to take him away as he couldn’t take any more.

‘His mother was hiding in the downstairs toilet such was her fear of her son. He had taken a cocktail of crack cocaine and alcohol. Both his parents were terrified of him.’

Cardiff Crown Court heard Green climbed on to the roof and began hurling tiles off during the incident in March.

A total of 49 police including armed officers were called to the house as Green shouted threats during the 12-hour stand off.

A total of 49 police including armed officers were called to the house as Green shouted threats during the 12-hour stand off (pictured) 

Mrs Payne said: ‘Green climbed on the roof of the porch and threw a tile which damaged the windscreen of his father’s car.

‘He then started shouting obscenities and throwing slates at the police officers who had arrived. One of the slates struck an officer in the leg, causing him pain.

‘A firearms team were deployed. The defendant headbutted a pane of glass, injuring his face and head.

‘He held pieces of glass and was threatening to self-harm and he had taken a cocktail of crack cocaine, base and alcohol. Both his parents were terrified of him.’

The court heard during the rooftop siege Mrs Green hid behind a curtain.

Green stayed on the roof all night but agreed to come down the following morning on March 31 when he was arrested.

He admitted affray, assaulting an emergency worker and two counts of criminal damage.

Gareth Williams, mitigating, said: ‘He caused a lot of damage and is very sorry and remorseful to his parents for that. It was in one way a cry for help. The real risk was to himself rather than others.’

Green was jailed for two years and two months and handed a three-year restraining order from contacting his parents.

Judge Nicola Jones told him: ‘You left your parents terrified and extremely distressed.

‘As a result of this stand-off, 49 police officers attended, including a firearms team and a negotiator.

‘This was a significant amount of police and public resources during the time of a national pandemic.’

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Red carpet toilet paper? These are the best at-home DIY Met Gala looks

Before pandemic PJs became the global uniform, there was this little thing called the Met Gala.

Held on the first Monday in May, the Vogue-hosted soirée at the Metropolitan Museum is typically NYC’s most glamorous evening. Celebrities and fashion elites hit the red carpet in haute couture to kick off the Met Costume Institute’s annual fashion exhibit.

As with most big events, this year’s party, themed, “About Time: Fashion and Duration” and chaired by Meryl Streep, Emma Stone and Lin-Manuel Miranda, has been indefinitely postponed due to the coronavirus. But style fans aren’t resigning themselves to sweatpants.

Around the globe, red-carpet obsessives have been participating in the #MetGalaChallenge. The dare — announced April 22 by Broadway actor and Met Gala knockout Billy Porter — has fashion lovers re-creating their favorite Gala get-ups with everyday materials from home and posting them on Instagram. Vogue will announce contest winners on Monday.

Here, The Post highlights the best of the Met Gala magic at home.

Masterpiece theater

Some people are spending their lockdown watching “Ozark.” Williamsburg’s Sanja Nestorovic has used hers to make not one, but five Met Gala re-creations.

“I started doing this because it was just something to keep me sane and not lose my mind,” Nestorovic tells The Post.

The 32-year-old, who usually tends bar on the Upper East Side, describes her personal style as “European chic meets New York cool.” For the challenge, she re-created Kylie Jenner’s black Alexander Wang dress from the 2018 Met Gala using nothing but trash bags and Scotch tape.

“My friends always told me, ‘You can put a trash bag over yourself and make it cool,’ ” says Nestorovic. “They were right.”

The best part? Wang himself commented on and reposted the photo on his account.

As for her other four looks, the Mitrovica, Kosovo, native re-created Céline Dion’s 2019 Oscar de la Renta Vegas showgirl style with a clear plastic recycling bag, ribbon and glitter, plus string lights for the headpiece.

For Emily Ratajkowski’s super-sexy 2019 Dundas dress, she used more clear recycling bags and silver Scotch tape.

Rihanna’s 2018 John Galliano for Maison Margiela came together almost entirely out of newspaper. And “the trickiest” one — Blake Lively’s 2016 Burberry dress — was mimicked with toilet paper and gift wrap.

A bright idea

To re-create Katy Perry’s unforgettable Jeremy Scott chandelier headdress from 2019, London fashion stylist Natasha Vinnikova took a brave stand.

“I stood on a chair under the light fixture to make it appear as though it was a headpiece,” says the 47-year-old. “It’s all about angles, right?”

She completed the look with tinfoil, vintage pearls and her own statement earrings.

She’s well-rounded

Solange’s 2015 Giles Deacon structural dress offered a perfect opportunity for Patrice Pugh, 25, to show off her pour-painting skills.

You “pour multiple colors of acrylic paint into one cup and pour it out to reveal a beautiful marble effect,” says Pugh, a New York City professional makeup artist who used sturdy photography paper for the base of the fanned-out dress.

She folded the dried creation into pleats, trimmed the edges and strung some string through it to tie it to her body.

Give her a rays!

Jasmina Vasquez-Carmel had a yearlong head start when designing Zendaya’s 2015 Fausto Puglisi gown.

“I started this project back in March 2019,” says the Montreal artist and die-hard Zendaya fan, who loves to make costumes in her spare time. The 22-year-old embellished the dress with over 1,000 crystals and beads, and made the sun-like appliqués with a 3-D printer and resin.

She has no plans to stop stanning the singer and actress. “I want to re-create all her Met Gala looks.”

What a gem

In just four hours, Victoire Saint Valmont, a Paris-based manager at a consulting firm, created this jaw-dropping copy of Bella Hadid’s Moschino dress designed by Jeremy Scott in 2019.

“It’s the perfect balance between chic, sensual and camp,” the 32-year-old says, referring to the theme of last year’s gala. He added tulle to the base of a plain bandeau dress to create a “mermaid effect,” snipped cutouts into the dress’s hip and torso, and stapled glossy-paper printouts of jewels onto the gloves to create the illusion of encrusted precious stones.

Painted lady

It took three days — and all of her 8-year-old son’s Crayola art supplies, glitter glue and water paints — for Melissa Surdy to re-create Naomi Campbell’s graphic Versace dress from 1990.

“It’s my first real fashion memory from my childhood,” the 39-year-old mom from Dyer, Ind., tells The Post of the dress. “I was 10 years old and in love with Christy Turlington and Naomi Campbell.” She re-created the look on paper, and finished it off with shiny ribbon straps.

A head of the competition

“Jared Leto’s effortless gender-fluid style has always been inspirational,” Jeff Johnson, a music teacher from Minneapolis, tells The Post. So the 41-year-old took a stab at Leto’s infamous 2019 camp-themed Gucci ensemble.

He emulated Leto’s locks with a wig, then tricked out a mannequin head with craft paint and Sharpie. Then, with husband Michael’s help, Johnson embellished a sleek red dress with crystal garland and safety pins.

Wedded bliss

Yes, toilet paper is a hot commodity during a pandemic. But Gabrielle Angelone, 25, says it was worth it to use two and a half rolls to mimic the ruffles on Lily Collins’ 2019 Giambattista Valli look, which was inspired by Priscilla Presley’s wedding dress.

“It was a flawless execution of camp,” the Melbourne, Australia, department store worker tells The Post. Her dupe also used a shirt, petticoat and tablecloth that Angelone trimmed and hemmed by hand.

Fit for a queen

LA-based costume designer and performer Karlo Jacobs, who goes by “Plastique Pussey,” chose to channel Beyoncé in her sheer bejeweled Givenchy “naked dress” from 2015.

“I figured if I am gonna do the Met (even from my living room), I’m going Queen Bey all the way,” Jacobs, 27, tells The Post. The dress took two weeks and 15 pounds of crystals and gems to craft.

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Smart toilet could spot cancer, heart disease and diabetes in faeces

Smart toilet gadget recognises users by their ‘anal print’ and analyses deposits to detect early warning signs of cancer, heart disease and diabetes

  • Smart toilet detect early warning signs of serious disease in faeces and urine 
  • A camera inside the bowl identifies between users due to their ‘anal print’
  • Data from the samples can reveal biomarkers for ten different types of diseases 

A smart-toilet that can detect signs of various diseases in faeces and urine has been built by scientists. 

The gadget fits inside a regular porcelain toilet bowl and uses cameras, test strips and sensors to identify warning signs of up to ten diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease.  

The technology uses a combination of fingerprint scanning on the flush lever and photographic images of the anus to differentiate between users when sitting down. 

Data from the tests is deposited into a secure cloud server for analysis, according to the team who built the tool at Stanford University. 

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 A smart-toilet that can detect signs of various diseases in faeces and urine has been built by scientists. Data from the tests is deposited into a secure cloud server for analysis, according to the team who built the tool at Stanford University

The gadget fits inside a regular porcelain toilet bowl and uses cameras, test strips and sensors to identify warning signs of up to ten diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease

Dr Sanjiv Gambhir, a professor at Stanford University, said: ‘We know it seems weird, but as it turns out, your anal print is unique.

‘The scans – both finger and nonfinger – are used purely as a recognition system to match users to their specific data.’

The gadget connects to an app which passes information to a medical team assigned by the patient for a full diagnosis and further tests, if necessary.   

Data protection is crucial for a device that collects highly personal and sensitive data and Professor Gambhir says the team has made this a top priority. 

‘We have taken rigorous steps to ensure all the information is de-identified when it’s sent to the cloud and that the information – when sent to health care providers – is protected under HIPAA.’

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act in the US restricts the disclosure of health care records. 

The researchers said their so-called ‘smart toilet’ technology could be useful for individuals who are genetically predisposed to certain conditions.

It would be useful for people at increased risk of developing irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), prostate cancer or kidney failure.

Dr Gambhir said: ‘Our concept dates back well over 15 years.

‘When I’d bring it up, people would sort of laugh because it seemed like an interesting idea, but also a bit odd.’

Urine samples undergo physical and molecular analysis while stool assessment is based on physical characteristics only.

Motion sensors under the seat detect when a person is sitting down and then a cartridge slides into the centre of the bowl with paper ‘dipstick-style’ strips.

These change colour when they come into contact with blood and sugar in the urine, for instance, indicators of disease. 

The technology uses a combination of fingerprint scanning on the flush lever and images of the anus from  camera in the bowl (pictured) to differentiate between users

HOW DOES THE SMART TOILET WORK?  

The gadget itself sits inside the porcelain bowl. 

The technology uses a combination of fingerprint scanning on the flush lever and images of the anus to differentiate between users. 

Motion sensors under the seat detect when a person is sitting down and then a cartridge slides into the centre of the bowl with paper ‘dipstick-style’ strips.  

These test for various biomarkers such as sugar or blood and change colour when it is detected. 

Flow rate, stream time and total volume are all also measured.  

There are also computer-vision and machine learning algorithms for analysing solid human waste based on physical characteristics – such as shape and consistency.

Data is then deposited into a secure cloud server, according to the team who built the tool at Sta 

The gadget connects to an app which passes information directly into the hands of a medical team assigned by the patient for a full diagnosis and further tests, if necessary. 

Flow rate, stream time and total volume are all also measured.  

There are also computer-vision and machine-learning algorithms for analysing solid human waste based on physical characteristics – such as shape and consistency. 

Professor Gambhir explained: ‘It’s sort of like buying a bidet add-on that can be mounted right into your existing toilet.

‘And like a bidet, it has little extensions that carry out different purposes.’ 

According to the researchers, the data gathered from the samples can reveal biomarkers for ten different types of diseases, ranging from infection to bladder cancer to kidney failure.

The technology is categorised as continuous health monitoring and has been tested on 21 participants to determine its efficacy. 

However, the researchers say the potential health benefits of their toilet system will only become clear in future large clinical studies.

To get a better feel for ‘user acceptance’, the US team also surveyed 300 prospective smart-toilet users.

More than half were ‘somewhat’ or ‘very’ comfortable with the idea of baring all in the name of precision health.

Dr Gambhir adds: ‘The thing about a smart toilet, though, is that unlike wearables, you can’t take it off.

‘Everyone uses the bathroom – there’s really no avoiding it – and that enhances its value as a disease-detecting device.’

Dr Gambhir says that while the toilet has clear benefits as a diagnostic tool, it is no replacement for a doctor or a clinical diagnosis.

According to Dr Gambhir, the next steps in their project will be to develop personalised tests tailored to the user.

The research is published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering. 

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