Brit designer unveils Paris Fashion eco-collection covered in grass

The Devil Wears GARDEN! British designer unveils bizarre Paris Fashion Week collection covered in blades of grass as part of Loewe’s ‘dystopian’ eco runway show

  • British designer Jonathan Anderson shared his range of climate-inspired clothing at Lowe’s Paris runway 
  • The collection featured shoes sprouting with grass as a warning about nature being harnessed by mankind
  • Models wore TV screens showing fish in the ocean as part of the surreal show in the fashion capital 

Climate change has become the trendiest cause for today’s liberal fashionistas.

And now a British designer has taken his eco fears to a bonkers new extreme by covering his clothing range in four inches of grass at Paris Fashion Week.

Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe spring-summer 2023 menswear collection saw models wearing flatscreen TVs depicting animals, and vegetation sprouting from their clothes.

The show was intended to raise awareness about how mankind uses nature for its own purposes, showing how one day, the only animals we will be able to see will be through a screen, and plants used for fashion.

The unusual dystopian show saw the models walking in front of a sanitised white wall bathed in a misty light.  

British designer Jonathan Anderson unveiled his bizarre dystopian vision of the future at Loewe’s show at Paris Fashion Week on Saturday

Anderson used the remarkable set and concept not only as a springboard for some of the most accomplished designs seen this season, but to make a thoughtful comment about ecology and humanity’s contempt for the natural world. Pictured: Models backstage at the Loewe Fashion show

If we continue, Anderson warned, that world will be destroyed and the only way to see bees will be on video

The models walked in one by one like robots to show British designer Jonathan Anderson’s dystopian vision of the future


A white minimalist sweater had surplus sleeves that flapped about limply at the side of the model, on top of white sports leggings and loafers sprouting 10cm clumps of grass 

Anderson used the set to make a comment about ecology and humanity’s contempt for the natural world.

If we continue, Anderson warned, that world will be destroyed and the only way to see bees will be on video.

The organic versus the robotic was explored in Anderson’s conceptual designs, including a minimalist sweater with surplus sleeves that flapped about limply at the side of the model, on top of white sports leggings and loafers sprouting 10cm clumps of grass.

Elsewhere, models wore plates of television screens showing deep water fish in the ocean, and plasma screen visors beamed out growing chrysanthemums. 

Houses compete to produce the most eye-catching, inventive and flamboyant show invitations at Fashion Week, delivered often by gas-guzzling couriers to each guest’s personal or professional address with little thought for the climate.

Other bizarre trends in Paris have seen Louis Vuitton sending out a board game – something akin to a trendy snakes and ladders – for its invite to a show plunging guests into the creative universe of the late designer Virgil Abloh.

For Dior’s bloom-inspired show, the house sent out flower seeds that one fashion reporter planted and have already produced sprouts.

But surely Loewe’s ‘invite’ was the most bizarre: A limp box of real watercress growing in soil.

The organic versus the robotic was explored in Anderson’s conceptual designs that were intentionally off-kilter


Bare chests and legs exposed vulnerability, while hard, square-strap bags slung across the shoulder added a contrasting fierceness

But the piece de resistance was the giant mustard toggle shoes that looked like the hooves of a horse and could equally have come from the set of a Star Wars planetary village


Houses compete to produce the most eye-catching, inventive and flamboyant show invitations, delivered often by gas-guzzling couriers to each guest’s personal or professional address with little thought for the climate

But surely Loewe’s ‘invite’ was the most bizarre: A limp box of real watercress growing in soil

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