Marble Arch Mound reopens to visitors 13 days after it closed

Slopen for business: Marble Arch Mound welcomes visitors again 13 days after being forced to close when it was slammed for looking more like a slag heap

  • Marble Arch mound opened to heavy criticism from visitors at the end of July
  • It was mockingly called a ‘slag heap’ and compared to old video game scenes
  • Westminster Council closed the £2m artificial and apologised admitting it ‘was clearly not ready’
  • Mound has now reopened to visitors who will not have to pay to go up in August
  • Council’s Labour leader Adam Hug said the hill ‘brought shame on Westminster’ 

Visitors were welcomed back to the embattled Marble Arch mound yesterday for free – after it was forced to close amid a huge outpouring of criticism.

Westminster City Council have dropped the £8 ticket price for everyone wanting to scaling the 130 steps to one of the most controversial views in London.

The site’s webpage is also accepting new bookings through to January.

But changes are still being made to the artificial hill just off Park Lane after it was branded a ‘slag heap’ and ‘the worst thing ever built in London’ by visitors and locals alike.

Visitors were welcomed back to the embattled Marble Arch mound yesterday for free – after it was forced to close amid a huge outpouring of criticism

Changes are still being made to the artificial hill just off Park Lane after it was branded a ‘slag heap’ and ‘the worst thing ever built in London’ by visitors and locals alike

Organisers admitted that the mound, with a £2million pricetag, was ‘clearly not ready’ when they open it to the public on July 26. 

Visitors slammed the views from atop which are mostly obscured by trees of surrounding buildings.

A cafe and play area that were supposed to have been created inside the mound had not been started on last week. 

A spokesperson said: ‘The first new bookings have taken place. We want people to go up and enjoy.

Visitors slammed the views from atop which are mostly obscured by trees of surrounding buildings.

Organisers admitted that the mound, with a £2million pricetag, was ‘clearly not ready’ when they open it to the public on July 26. The turf covering the mound has turned mostly brown 

‘Changes are still being made, work is still taking place at the Mound and further information is expected in the coming days.’

Last week, the council’s Labour leader Adam Hug said the mound had ‘brought shame on Westminster across the world’.

He called on the council to say why the mound was allowed to open and how much it will cost taxpayers in total. Westminster Council was contacted for comment. 

Westminster Council’s chief executive Stuart Love said in a statement: ‘We’re very sorry that the Marble Arch Mound wasn’t ready for visitors when it opened earlier this week.

‘London’s businesses and residents have suffered through the pandemic and we built the Mound as part of our bigger plan to get people back into the City and into the shops, restaurants, theatres and to see the amazing sights the West End has to offer. 

Westminster Council has already apologised for the botched launch of the £2million Marble Arch Mound (pictured), which closed last week after just two days

The 82-ft tall mound, planned by Dutch architect company MVRDV, was designed (pictured) to give views of the capital’s Oxford Street, Hyde Park, Mayfair and Marylebone 

‘We wanted to open the Mound in time for the summer holidays and we did not want to disappoint people who had already booked tickets.

‘We made a mistake and we apologise to everyone who hasn’t had a great experience on their visit.

‘With that in mind we’re going to make The Mound free for everyone to climb throughout August.’

He added: ‘We are very much looking forward to welcoming visitors back so they can enjoy everything London has to offer and can make their mind up about the Mound.’

The 82-ft tall mound, planned by Dutch architect company MVRDV, was designed to give views of the capital’s Oxford Street, Hyde Park, Mayfair and Marylebone.

It is part of a scheme to increase footfall in the shopping district as lockdown restrictions ease.

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