Rolling Stones threaten to sue Trump for using their songs at rallies

Rolling Stones threaten to sue Donald Trump for using their songs at his rallies despite cease-and-desist order

  • The Rolling Stones are threatening President Donald Trump with legal action because he is still using their songs at his rallies despite their objections
  • Their legal team is working with music rights organization BMI to stop use of their material in Trump’s reelection campaign
  • The band’s 1969 classic ‘You Can´t Always Get What You Want’ is a popular song at the president’s events
  •  It was played again at the close of Trump’s rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday
  • Many artists have slammed Trump for using their music, including Neil Young, Rihanna, Guns N’ Roses frontman Axl Rose  and the family of the late Tom Petty

The Rolling Stones are threatening President Donald Trump with legal action for using their songs at his rallies despite cease-and-desist directives.

The Stones said in a statement Sunday that their legal team is working with music rights organization BMI to stop use of their material in Trump’s reelection campaign.

‘The BMI have notified the Trump campaign on behalf of the Stones that the unauthorized use of their songs will constitute a breach of its licensing agreement,´ the Stones said. 

‘If Donald Trump disregards the exclusion and persists, then he would face a lawsuit for breaking the embargo and playing music that has not been licensed.´´

The Stones had complained during Trump’s 2016 campaign about the use of their music to fire up his conservative base at rallies.

The Rolling Stones´ 1969 classic ‘You Can´t Always Get What You Want’ was a popular song for his events. 

It was played again at the close of Trump’s recent rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma – an indoor event criticized for its potential to spread coronavirus.

Rolling Stones (from left) Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts, Keith Richards and Ron Wood have threatened President Donald Trump with legal action for using their songs at his rallies

President Donald Trump played Rolling Stones song ‘You Can´t Always Get What You Want’ at his rally at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma

It came after Tom Petty’s estate issued Trump a formal cease and desist order for using his 1989 song I Won’t Back Down during his sparsely-attended Tulsa rally. 

Both the late Tom Petty and his family firmly stand against racism and discrimination of any kind,’ the statement read.

‘Tom Petty would never want a song of his used for a campaign of hate. He liked to bring people together. We believe in America and we believe in democracy.

‘But Donald Trump is not representing the noble ideals of either. We would hate for fans that are marginalized by this administration to think we were complicit in this usage.’

The statement read: ‘We would hate for fans that are marginalized by this administration to think we were complicit in this usage’

On Tuesday, Panic! At The Disco frontman Brendon Urie demanded Trump stop using their songs, after he used their 2018 hit song High Hopes during a rally in Phoenix. 

The 33-year-old star tweeted: ‘Dear Trump Campaign, F*** you. You’re not invited. Stop playing my song…Donald Trump represents nothing we stand for.’

Urie then urged his 6.6M social media following to register to vote to help get ‘this monster out [of office] in November.’

Other artists have also complained about having their music associated with Trump’s events.

A year ago, Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne demanded Trump stop using anymore of his music, including 1980 banger Crazy Train, for political ads or campaigns. 

The 33-year-old pop star tweeted: ‘Dear Trump Campaign, F*** you. You’re not invited. Stop playing my song…Donald Trump represents nothing we stand for’

Urie urged his 6.6M social media following to register to vote to help get ‘this monster out [of office] in November.’

Trump used Panic! At The Disco’s 2018 hit song High Hopes during a rally in Phoenix on Tuesday, sparking outrage from frontman Brendon Urie

Grammy Award-winning musician Neil Young lashed out at Trump in 2018 after hearing one of his songs played against his wishes during Trump’s pre-midterm campaign rallies. 

The Canadian-born musician admonished Trump for using his 1990 single, ‘Rockin´ in the Free World,’ in spite of earlier warnings. 

In 2018, Rihanna tweeted that neither she nor her people ‘would ever be at or around one of those tragic rallies’ after Trump played her 2008 hit Please Don’t Stop the Music. 

That same day, Guns N’ Roses frontman Axl Rose tweeted that the twice-divorced father-of-five was a ‘s***bag’ for ignoring his ‘formal request’ to stop using Sweet Child ‘o Mine from 1987.

And Aerosmith has repeatedly sent cease and desist warnings to the former Democrat for using Dream On and Livin’ on the Edge at his rallies in 2015 and 2018.

‘Even though I have the legal right to use Steven Tyler’s song, he asked me not to,’ Trump – who struggled to book bands at his 2017 inauguration – tweeted in 2015.

‘Have better one to take its place!’

Other legends demanding the Donald cease from playing their music includes Prince, Queen, Pharrell, George Harrison, Neil Young, Adele, Elton John, R.E.M., Twisted Sister, and more.

Trump’s much-hyped campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, last Saturday was the first public re-election event since the coronavirus pandemic forced the president to shelve live speeches to his supporters.

Despite the campaign’s claims leading up to the rally that more than a million tickets were reserved, Tulsa officials put the exact number who gathered in the arena at slightly more than 6,200.

Trump and Vice President Mike Pence also canceled speeches that they planned to give to an overflow crowd just outside the BOK Center after a few dozen people had attended.

In the days since the Tulsa rally, the president and his supporters have claimed that would-be rallygoers were scared off by the coronavirus as well as Black Lives Matter protests that have swept the nation since the death of George Floyd.

Trump surrogates have also claimed that the rally in Tulsa shattered television viewing records on cable news.

Source: Read Full Article