Townhouse built for King Henry VIII's confessor is on sale for £6.2m

Gorgeous Grade II listed townhouse built for King Henry VIII’s confessor but now with six bedrooms, bar and suntrap terrace overlooking the Thames is for sale for £6.2million

  • Longlands House was built for John Longland, Bishop of Lincoln, and boast six bedrooms and a basement bar
  • Longland is understood to have helped to persuade Tudor King to annul marriage to wife Catherine of Aragon
  • Property in Henley-on-Thames has a grand 18th century façade but its 15th century stables are now a cottage 
  • Awe-inspiring features include basement bar and media room and a roof terrance offering panoramic views 

A breathtaking Grade II-listed townhouse built for King Henry VIII’s confessor has hit the market for £6.25million.  

Longlands House was built for John Longland, Bishop of Lincoln, understood to have been one of the first to persuade the Tudor King to annul his marriage to first wife Catherine of Aragon.

The six-bedroom property in Henley-on-Thames has a grand 18th century façade but the original 15th century stables form a self-contained two-bedroom cottage at the back.

It’s awe-inspiring features include its basement bar and media room and a stunning suntrap roof terrace offering panoramic views over the River Thames. 

A breathtaking Grade II-listed townhouse (a dining room, pictured) built for King Henry VIII’s confessor has hit the market for £6.25million

Longlands House (a living room, pictured) was built for John Longland, Bishop of Lincoln, understood to have been one of the first to persuade the Tudor King to annul his marriage to first wife Catherine of Aragon

The six-bedroom property (a hallway, pictured) in Henley-on-Thames has a grand 18th century façade but the original 15th century stables form a self-contained two-bedroom cottage at the back

It’s awe-inspiring features include its basement bar and media room and a stunning suntrap roof terrace offering panoramic views over the River Thames

 Longlands (pictured) is one of just a few townhouses in the town that has not been converted into flats and is just 120 yards from the banks of the Thames

The 15th-century stables have been converted into a 1,275 sq ft cottage (pictured) with a kitchen, living room, office, two bedrooms and three bathrooms, a private gated walled garden and generous parking

John Longland, Bishop of Lincoln, gained the favour of Henry VIII

Longlands is one of just a few townhouses in the town that has not been converted into flats and is just 120 yards from the banks of the Thames.

Clive Hemsley, the current owner, purchased the property as commercial offices in 2000 and ran a successful advertising agency from it before deciding to restore it to its former glory as a family home.

John Longland was appointed Dean of Salisbury in 1514 and became closely associated with influential men like Sir Thomas More and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

He gained the favour of Henry VIII, who appointed him Bishop of Lincoln in 1521 and the king’s almoner – who distributed alms to the poor – and confessor.

Longland sat as assistant judge in Henry’s divorce proceedings and willingly signed the Act of Succession – which declared the king the supreme head of the church of England and not the bishop in Rome. 

Clive Hemsley, the current owner, purchased the property as commercial offices in 2000 and ran a successful advertising agency from it before deciding to restore it to its former glory as a family home (a bedroom, pictured)

John Longland (Longlands House, pictured) was appointed Dean of Salisbury in 1514 and became closely associated with influential men like Sir Thomas More and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey

Longland gained the favour of Henry VIII, who appointed him Bishop of Lincoln in 1521 and the king’s almoner – who distributed alms to the poor – and confessor. Pictured: One of the rooms in Longlands House

Longland sat as assistant judge in Henry’s divorce proceedings and willingly signed the Act of Succession – which declared the king the supreme head of the church of England and not the bishop in Rome. Pictured: The kitchen in Longlands House

Born at Greenwich Palace in 1491, Henry VIII was the third child and second son of Henry VII and his wife. 

Under Henry VIII’s reign, England turned in favour of Protestantism and split from Rome. 

John Longland is understood to have been one of the first to persuade the Tudor King to annul his marriage to first wife Catherine of Aragon. 

Longland was appointed Dean of Salisbury in 1514 and became closely associated with influential men like Sir Thomas More and Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

He gained the favour of Henry VIII, who appointed him Bishop of Lincoln in 1521 and the king’s almoner – who distributed alms to the poor – and confessor.

Longland sat as assistant judge in Henry’s divorce proceedings and willingly signed the Act of Succession – which declared the king the supreme head of the church of England and not the bishop in Rome.

It was passed in parliament on March 23, 1534. The king’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon was annulled by the Archbishop of Canterbury on May 23, 1533.

Unlike some of his fellow clerics he never fell out of the king’s favour and died in his seventies in 1547, four months after Henry.

 

Unlike some of his fellow clerics he never fell out of the king’s favour and died in his seventies in 1547, four months after Henry.

Much of the existing property dates to 1786 and it has been one of Henley’s landmark buildings since then.

The house is next to the parish church and part of a group of listed buildings and structures in the area.

From the 1970s the building was used as head offices for a brewery, then an investment firm before Mr Hemsley used it for his advertising agency. 

Now the property has 4,467 square feet of living space with a bar and media room in the basement and a kitchen, dining room and living room on the ground floor.

It boasts six bedrooms, a study or studio space and four bathrooms spread over the first and second floors.

It is topped with a suntrap roof terrace with views over the Thames.

The 15th-century stables have been converted into a 1,275 square foot cottage with a kitchen, living room, office, two bedrooms and three bathrooms, a private gated walled garden and generous parking.

Joanna Cocking, from estate agent Hamptons said: ‘For me it’s about the rarity value – Georgian houses of this size and status are very rare outside of London, unless you go to somewhere like Bath.

‘And the fact it’s 120 yards from the river with this incredible roof terrace. It’s a gem because it’s a real one off.

‘It was a labour of love for the owner. He had it as his offices and decided he wanted it for his home.

‘It’s not going to appeal to everybody because some people don’t want to live in a town but it would appeal to someone discerning about a life in the country who doesn’t want to isolate.

‘You can enjoy that cafe culture but then you step through this old carriageway into this blissful walled garden and a stroll along the river is only a couple minutes’ walk away.’ 

Estate agent Ms Cocking added: ‘You can enjoy that cafe culture but then you step through this old carriageway into this blissful walled garden (pictured) and a stroll along the river is only a couple minutes’ walk away’

The property’s walled garden features a summerhouse making it ideal for buyers looking for a tranquil escape

The property is nestled in a town making it ideal for a buyer looking for a slice of the country while still remaining connected to  local amenities

The six-bedroom property – situated next to a parish church – has become a landmark building in Henley-on-Thames

The property has 4,467 square feet of living space (its floor plan, pictured). The 15th-century stables have been converted into a 1,275 square foot cottage

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